Young female scientist injecting GMO into   potato in  laboratory

What If Prospecting Were Cancer?0

By Tibor Shanto – tibor.shanto@sellbetter.ca 

Not to be overly dramatic, but most people who find out they have caner or any terminal disease, will immediately seek a cure, take steps to change their lifestyle or habits to alter their fate. Rarely or ever would they ignore it or make changes to unrelated things as a means of healing the illness. Well, most except some VP’s of Sales or sales leaders.

You would not believe the number of these folks I meet with, who unprompted, without “probing” or cajoling, share with me their concerns about the state of their team’s pipelines, and the lack of new opportunities. When I ask what they attribute that to, they tell me:

  • Their people are ineffective at prospecting
  • Preferring to spend time with existing customers
  • They spend all their time researching on the web and social media – very little time leveraging the research by actually putting it to good use
  • Or just not wanting to do it at all

This of course leaves them in precarious position, while there may be good organic growth that they can coast on for a while, the new revenue coming in is only slightly ahead of their natural client attrition rate; leaving them only one breath away from a client leaving, and the whole year going pear shape.

You would think that once they examine and understand the symptoms, the risks and severity of the situation, they would address the cause as directly and effectively as possible. But no, the VP”s/Leaders in question, seem to feel that it is better to focus and deal with something else, some other element of sales as a means of addressing the issue. It sometimes reminds me of an old joke, where a farmer is suffering greatly with a tooth ache, as a cure, his friend and fellow farmer suggests that he drop a cement block on his toes, “Ya, you’ll forget that tooth ache in no time at all.” Now I have nothing against alternatives to main stream medical care, but even I know there are only so many toes you can break before you have to see a real doctor.

Seriously, they will deal with and change anything than what counts, i.e. their people’s ability to properly prospect. A popular favourite, probably due to visibility, is to focus on the “leads”; yup, “better leads”, or “more leads”. That’s the ticket, they are ignoring the leads they have now, or making at best a token effort, so let’s give them more to squander. A variation on the theme, “lets hire a lead gen firm.” So one company locally did that, and their reps came back:

“The leads suck”
Why?
‘The guy said he is not ready for at least six months”
How long is your sales cycle?
“About 4 months” (Data pulled from their CRM by sales ops showed just over 6 months)

But even if it was four months, seems like the right length of runway to unfold the sales properly at a relaxed pace. But it seemed the preferred method was to wait, till everyone is all over the buyer like white on rice, and then engage, just around the buyer has made their choice and is looking for pricing.

Another leader who after deciding that his people needed to prospect more regularly and do it better when they do, put the team through a presentations skills program. I guess his theory was that if any of the team ran into a prospect, (by mistake), they would be adept at presenting.

If prospecting was cancer, most people would deal with it directly, regardless of the effort required. Seems to me that having a continuously anaemic pipeline, or one full with names growing fungus like the orange we forgot in the back of the fridge, points to the fact that you have a cancer in your sales organization: deal with it, before it deals with your career.

Become one of the thousands of sales professionals receiving my latest updates on sales execution, tools, tips and more.

Join Now!

I can I can’t

Prospecting? – “Not As Much As I’d Like To”0

By Tibor Shanto – tibor.shanto@sellbetter.ca 

Why Not?

I never understood why sales people and sales leaders who have anaemic pipelines and matching sales results, think they solve their issues by focusing on everything but. They need to stop symptoms, and work on curing the cause.

Success in prospecting starts with fully committing to it, and then actually executing.

Working with reps across many industries, one commonality is the lack of real commitment to prospecting success. When I ask sales people what their high value activities are, prospecting usually makes the list. I am convinced that it is there because sales people feel they have to put it there, not because they believe it or do it. How do I know?

I can I can’tFirst is the answer to my next question to them: “Over the course of your sales cycle, not daily but over the cycle, what percentage of your time is committed to prospecting?” I get answers ranging from 10% to 50%. Removing the extremes, the number usually settles around 25% – 30%. They always glance at their manager as they give me the number, I am never sure if it is for approval, or fear of being called out. Then, when you highlight the fact that 25% of a 50-hour work week is 12.5 hours a week, or 2.5 hour per day.

“No, no, no, that’s too much, I need to do other things, important things.” And there is your first clue, they have no idea because not only do they not do it, and they have no idea what their metrics are, and therefore what they need to do to succeed. And why should they when all the hip pundits have told them that sales is not a numbers game. Instead, it’s a strange version of the game of hide and seek, where in this case you are working to be “found”, and starve if you’re not found. Metrics are all about numbers, much like accountability. In the end, they do commit to a time they need to not just set aside for prospecting, but actually doing it.

Second, when I go back for reinforcement sessions, you find they’ve done bubkes. Nothing at all, not an hour, not what their metrics and quota demanded, they have done no prospecting.

When I ask how much prospecting they have done since last week, I get a sheepish smile, followed by “Not As Much As You’d Like To”. Well why not, “I wanted to, but I had some important things to attend to.” Like what?

What can be more important for a rep than to ensure they have the requisite opportunities in their pipeline? Sometimes there are other important things, but if they allocated time to all their high value activities, not just the ones they like, they could have avoided the conflict, and got both done. But usually it is some BS, the one they hope will slow me down is that they were working on a deal (does not dawn on them that the deal was one day a prospect). But when one digs deeper, it tunes out the deal they were working on has no next step, has been in their pipeline well past it’s “good through date”, but it has enough life in it to serve as an excuse when they should be executing.

Become one of the thousands of sales professionals receiving my latest updates on sales execution, tools, tips and more.

Join Now!

Market-Research4

6 Things Every Good Sales Person Should Know About Personal Branding0

The Pipeline Guest Post – Megan Totka

Today, nearly every person has a personal brand. The good news is, there are a lot of things you, as a salesperson or small business owner, can do to build a really awesome personal brand. You can choose to guide and cultivate the brand or select actions so it’s defined on your behalf – whichever way you choose to build your personal brand, never brush off its importance. You may wonder how to become the complete salesperson – that’s not an easy feat. However, start by taking a look at these six things every good salesperson should know about personal branding.

The importance of being seen as an expert in your field.

It’s harder to be a salesperson today in many ways – it’s the age of the educated consumer. The best salespeople have the ability to curate excellent content and share it via social networks and blogs. They remember to keep it purposeful and relevant and entertaining when possible. Once you decide how you wish your brand to be perceived, you can become more strategic about your personal brand.

The importance of authenticity in relationships.

A good salesperson knows that at the end of the day, human-to-human relationships are what it all boils down to. It’s easier to maintain current customers than sell new ones. A recent survey by Marketing Metrics found that the probability of selling to an existing customer is 60-70%, while the probability of selling to a new prospect is just 5-20%. This is why it’s so important to stay connected with customers on social networks or via email marketing or blogging. Make it a point to learn how to develop an authentic online voice — sounding robotic and giving sales pitches gets you nowhere.

Make sure to keep it personal.

No one wants to feel as though they are just another number, another sale. Good sales people know that they need to do everything they can to learn more about their prospects and clients to make them feel special. Understand the value of promoting your business at a local level. Always remember to personalize any mass emails. Don’t become overly reliant on automation to pull leads. Data can inform but not replace their brain function and intuition.

Never doubt the value of the network.

Networking should never be an afterthought or something that is squeezed into a day. Good sales people look forward to it and it becomes part of their daily routine. Social networks and digital tools help build networks. Good salespeople realize that they can make new connections any day of the week from any location.

Realize it’s crucial to show up and make a statement.

Always wear your Sunday best for presentations and when meeting others. Clean, neat clothes that fit well and neatly combed hair make a good first impression. Take pride in your work: edit letters for errors; check emails before they’re sent, etc. so you don’t look unprofessional. Make sure everything about you makes a positive statement.

Accept that persistence doesn’t do anything good for you.

Good salespeople know the importance of pulling back and think before they overdo it and turn people away. While being assertive is okay, and even coming back to people who previously turned you down is acceptable, it is never okay to hound people. You don’t want to come across as desperate – or even worse — bothersome.

Salespeople always concentrate on their personal brand, and know that the interactions they have leave a trail of bred crumbs straight to their business doors. Good salespeople want people to spread positive word of mouth about their business, and want those words to flow long after they’ve left the room. Most importantly, good salespeople and successful small business owners always remember that a strong personal brand should be ever evolving.

What are some points you think all salespeople should know to make them more successful?

About Megan Totka

Megan Totka is the Chief Editor for ChamberofCommerce.com. ChamberofCommerce.com helps small businesses grow their business on the web and facilitates connectivity between local businesses and more than 7,000 Chambers of Commerce worldwide. She specializes on the topic of small business tips and resources and business news. Megan has several years of experience on the topics of small business marketing, copywriting, SEO, online conversions and social media. Megan spends much of her time establishing new relationships for ChamberofCommerce.com, publishing weekly newsletters educating small business on the importance of web presence, and contributing to a number of publications on the web. Megan can be reached at megan@chamberofcommerce.com.
Website: www.chamberofcommerce.com

Confused by Too Many Choices Arrow Street Signs

Limiting Choices Increases Results0

Tibor Shanto – tibor.shanto@sellbetter.ca

Despite the evidence to the contrary, many sales people and businesses see multiple options presented to prospects as being “good” or the “right” thing, for the prospect, and by extension themselves. Many business owners tell me that they stock or offer a wide range of products or services to ensure that they can meet the demands of all comments. Some of this is based on the assumption that the buyer actually knows what they want. This fatal sales character flaw is shared by many sales people, especially from the consultative or relationship school. These sales people see their role more client therapists than revenue generators.

You can sort of understand the small business owners, clients come in asking for something they currently don’t have. They have two choices, take the time and effort to understand the buyer’s objective, and then sell them on an equally valid alternative they do have. Or, they squeeze some things over on the second shelf, and order a dozen of what the prospect asked for, because “If this guy wants it, so will others, best to be prepared when the next buyer asks for it.” A big if.

While one can’t blame small business owners for falling into the trap of endless choices, it should be different with sales people. Choice is a bad drug, once you are addicted, it takes a lot to kick this habit that’s killing sales, and threatening capitalism as we know it. Yet sales people consume and dispense choice disregarding the impact on their success.

Part of the challenge is people see the role of a sales professional. Broadly speaking there are those “consultative” types, “the customer is always right” types who for the sake of “relationship” will subordinate their success and that of their employers.

Consistently successful sales professionals see their role a little differently, they see themselves as a Subject Matter Expert, (SME). Further, their expertise is not product related, but related to helping the prospect achieve their objectives. Focusing on objectives, business impacts and outcomes, frees one up from worrying about product/service, to outcomes. From a business standpoint it really is about the end, not the means. Focusing on the “end”, the outcomes and impacts, narrows the discussion, and creates focus.

Consultative sellers will present proposals with multiple options, SME’s offer up the right choice based on what the “end” the prospect is trying to achieve. With the former you have to explain each option, the pros and cons of each, the whole exercise begins to look like a spaghetti tossing contest. While many of these sellers take great pride in expounding on each option, demonstrating their rich product knowledge. Here is what the prospect is hearing, “I haven’t got a clue what you are looking for Mr. Buyer, but I gotta make a sale here or my ass is fried; so imagonna put three options in front of you, hope you know what you want, hope I can sell you the middle one, but I’ll settle for the lowest option too, any actually”.

Be the expert, understand what they are trying to achieve, not what they want to buy or you want to sell. No matter what you are selling commodity or rocket ships, limiting choice will help you understand and sell better. In high end products, offering one choice, even when not on the mark, will drive discussion, discovery and insight, and establish you as an expert in the process. Options will give the client the impression you have taken it as far as you can, based on their input, and now they are on their own to make the decision. Risky business.

With commodities, I’ll share a story. I was working with client in a competitive market, there were a lot of choices, vendors, product, bulk, etc. My client’s team would always showcase three offerings, most prospects loved the middle choice, right balance of price/feature. But in the end he sold considerably more of the lowest price product, even among those who loved the middle feature; (just read the “good enough” segment of CEB’s Challenger Customer). I suggested that they drop the lowest option, and just present two, making what was the middle choice now the lowest of the two. His volumes did not go down, but almost all the sales were of the new low, prior middle priced offering.

By limiting choice, he increased outcomes for both his buyers and his company.

QF Webinar
New Or Improved

Same New, Same New!0

Tibor Shanto – tibor.shanto@sellbetter.ca

We are familiar with the expression “same old same old”, indicating that little has changed save the packaging. This is why you don’t see marketers and ad folks lead an advert or campaign by proclaiming that this “new thing they are presenting, is really the same as previous versions or releases, but we did slap a fresh coat of paint on it”. Instead we are presented with yet another new improved dish detergent, that leave the plates no cleaner than last year’s model. We have all seen our favourite web site introduce “upgrades” that feature little or no new functionality, just buttons moved around like the deckchairs on the Titanic.

I think that in sales, for something to qualify as “new”, not swept clean or rinsed off, but truly new, it should have two elements, A) it should allow you to do something in a measurably more efficient way while leading to more prospect and/or sales; B) it should change your behaviour and how you execute moving forward. For example, when BlackBerry introduced the first device to combined e-mail and phone in one handset in 2002. Clearly made one more productive in a sales context and clearly changed the way sales people, and all business people behaved after it’s adoption. Many of the specialized productivity apps you find on tablets, had the same impact on many roles.

As sales professional your most valuable asset is your time, your most valuable tool is your sales process or sales-flow. Any “new” thing, be it a sales tool, app or methodology, should be measured against those two elements, do they free up time that you can reinvest into selling, and do they help you execute your process better, leading to you being able to sell better and more? If they do great, the time and effort invested, the momentary distraction of applying something new, are all worth it given the increased sales and productivity that will follow, and on an ongoing basis. If not, then is it really worth your time and distraction?

While I know a lot of Apple groupies, few get every release of the iPhone. The question that needs to be answered is whether the change was either needed, due to a shift in the market or a flaw with previous iteration. If not, it is a safe bet the biggest beneficiary is the person/company selling the “New”. Did the provider of the service, hardware, software or what have you, manufacture the impetus for change, and is the only one pointing to it, or did it evolve because of a hole in the market? If it is the latter great, especially if that hole is impacting your ability to succeed. If on the other hand the only one impacted by the “new” is the guy selling it, you should spend time elsewhere.

If leveraging your process to better use your time and improve execution to sell better is something new to you, start there, worry about buying something new later. New does not equal good, good equals good, and the test for that is not newness.

Become one of the thousands of sales professionals receiving my latest updates on sales execution, tools, tips and more.

Join Now!

Richtung Pfeil

A Sweeter Approach To Prospecting Success4

By Tibor Shanto – tibor.shanto@sellbetter.ca 

As we head in to the second half of the year you realize you need to prospect and get some more opportunities in your pipeline. As you seek advice from your peers, one veteran tells you “You gotta buckle down and make more calls”, sage advice from someone who is under quota. Then you turn to a younger colleague and ask, not direct but by text, what she does, she tells you “OMG, get in to the 21st century, forget that calling stuff, you need to be a social seller.” But looking at the leader board, she is not making quota either. The guy at the top of the board, the one you really want advice from, is out of the office, making quota.

Forget the “us and them” of the chattering class. Stop being conflicted, stop wasting time and brain cells, do what the silent successful minority is doing, Reese’s Selling, where they combine the best of many viable selling approaches to deliver more than any can on their own. Safe, easy, tasty and quota satisfying!

As with most things in sales your only limits are your imagination and willingness to execute.

Become one of the thousands of sales professionals receiving my latest updates on sales execution, tools, tips and more.

Join Now!

hashtag

#Notafact2

By Tibor Shanto – tibor.shanto@sellbetter.ca 

I just can’t help myself, but sport analogies are so great when it comes to making some points about sales.  You know when your team is down by some outrageous score, no hope of a come back, Jesus or not, just like the Raptors in game 5.  But still you have fans yelling “Defence, Defence, Defence” as though the louder they yell, the more times they yell it will somehow make a real difference, as though they can make the rally “trend”.  At the same time, seeing players interviewed on the side line, repeating symbolic words and well worn clichés, as though saying it will change the lack of execution on the playing field.

This came to the fore when I attended a recent sales event, where the masses gathered to hear the pundits speak.  To be honest I felt like I was at a sales revival more than a sales event, where amens and hallelujahs were replaced hashtags and internet speak.  To be clear, it is important that presenters speak the language of their audience, just as sellers need to be multi-lingual, and speak the language of their buyer, language is important after all since it is the vehicle for substance.  But when there is a complete lack of substance, language is the only take away, or the only message; Marshall you came too soon.  In this case or event, the less substance the presenter had, the more #this and #that they threw out.  It left one sitting there wondering WTF they were saying and wishing that they would just stfu.

Of course the tweets and RT’s streamed behind them on the big screen, only to be reshared and retweeted by the masses.  “Oh look Henry, we’re trending”.  No you’re echoing, it reminds one of the singer at the Holiday Inn on the edge of town, telling everyone that they are ”world famous in Topeka Kansas”, and even then, just that night.

Just because you slap a hashtag on something does not make it real, better or a fact, in many cases it just makes the message more irritating.  You can tell the crowd that the only way to succeed in sales is one#way, the one in your #book, only to be out hashtaged by the next presenter, with his #book, with more hashtag friendly words on the cover that he can get everyone in the crowd to repeat.  #Boring #Sad

As with most things in sales, the arbiter is the buyer, or in professional selling the non-buyer, those who did not come to your website and download the same thing they downloaded from five of you competitors along their 57% of the journey, a journey they started without any prompting from a sales person, because they had a need.  Professional sellers are the ones that identify, reach out to and engage with those potential prospects who were not interested in starting a “buyer” journey, because they were not “buyers”, had no perceived need, no perceived need.  With there prospects, you need to lean on substance, not colloquial expressions, or trending buzzwords. #Oyvey.

Don’t forget to join me and Michelle Schifrin is the Lead Customer Success Manager at Prezi, for a webinar today at 1:00 PM ET.
REGISTER HERE

 

Business man point: Turn Prospects Into Sales Appointments

You Have To Sell Is The Appointment First1

By Tibor Shanto – tibor.shanto@sellbetter.ca 

In the past I have posted about the attitude sales people have towards prospecting, some see it as a necessary evil and unpleasant part of their job, something they have to “tolerate” early in their career, until they build up a sufficient base to live off. How many times have you heard a rep with tenure say they “have earned the right not prospect”, or the less honest version “put me in front of the right guy and I’ll close them.” While that may be true, the big bucks in sales go to the ones who can get in front of the right guys on their own.

One thing that differentiates the complete sales person, the sales people who can execute all elements of the job, not just the easy ones or the ones they like, is their understanding that prospecting is a sale. Perhaps the hardest sale of all, selling the appointment. The same instincts, skills and disciplines it takes to sell the product or service, are involved in selling an appointment, it’s just that the prospect is not yet a willing participant. Which is why you need to take the attitude that the appointment has to be sold.

Beyond role play, one of the things that we do with clients is listen to recordings of actual calls by the reps we train. Not one or three calls when they know they are being listened, but recording of dozens and dozens of calls throughout their week, getting a real sense of what they are doing when it counts, not just to impress on one or two calls. What you hear across dozens of calls in consistent; sure you can explain one call, or two, but when you hear the same mistakes over the course of days and weeks as we do, there is no denying facts.

Right from the time the prospect answers you can tell which reps came to sell, and which came to take orders, hoping the prospect throws them a bone. The way they initiate the call, how they engage the prospect. Not just style and mannerism, but what they speak to, and the narrative they paint for the buyer. This is not just about enthusiasm, while that is key and infectious, when wrapped around the wrong message it becomes toxic, and no one wants to be infected with that. Or the diminutive subservient posture they take, if you close your eyes you see Goofy when they try to handle the “all set” objection: “Well maybe I can be your number two if you ever tire of number one, ah, gosh darn it.”

Those reps who sell the appointment are much more often the ones who sell the deal, while the others are more likely to be used for info and price concessions, or worse, as a means of getting concessions from the incumbent, and once that is achieved, they are tossed to the curb.

Become one of the thousands of sales professionals receiving my latest updates on sales execution, tools, tips and more.   

Join Now!

Businesswoman wearing red cape and opening her shirt like superhero

A Super Question You Should Use4

By Tibor Shanto – tibor.shanto@sellbetter.ca 

In the past I had written about the fact that your sales process and the way you or your team execute that process is most likely the last real way of differentiating yourself from your competition. I think by now we can all agree that product is rarely the deciding factor; and when it is, it is usually driven by price, regardless of what marketing is smoking. With all due respect and deference to product designers, engineers, marketing and branding folks, when you look at it in the cold light of day, there is not that much difference in the top two products in most categories. What many will tout as being different, is more subjective than data or fact based. With 85% – 90% feature overlap, one may be able to spin the benefits a bit, but if products could sell themselves, I’d be writing a different blog. As with beauty or value (or some tell me), difference is often in the eye of the beholder.

So what can you do to sound or be different when selling. There is a whole bunch of things, but I think the easiest lies in the questions you ask. And among the many questions you can and should ask, there is one I like because it is easy to answer, sets you apart from many, you will learn a whole bunch of useful things, and despite its high octane, it has no risk, all upside.

What’s the question you ask? (Sorry I just had to) Here it is:

“What is the one thing you have always wanted from a supplier like me (us), but have never had anyone do, or deliver?

Many I present this question to are first taken aback. They say, “what if they come up with something we can’t do or deliver?” There is only one answer to that: who cares?

By definition they have not gotten this from anyone, just look at the question. The fact that you can’t do it, does not put you in a bad light. Let’s go to extremes, say they want to go to Mars, first class with kosher meals, no one can do that, so there is no downside.

In a more conventional setting, say they come up with something you can’t do, you don’t look any worse than the others, but there is upside. You can explore why they are looking for that specific thing. That will give you great insight about the buyer, and more importantly their objectives. In most cases you get bonus points for trying.

By understanding what they are trying to achieve, you may be able to offer an alternative means of achieving the very thing, but in a different way. Most buyers are focused on achieving their objectives, few will get hung up on the means, if you get them there, you get the glory.

What you’ll also find is that at times you can in fact deliver what they respond with, or something so close, it will satisfy the requirement. In this case asking the question has nothing but upside, you win the deal, the client, and referrals to follow. Those referrals are likely to focus more on how you sold them and met their expectations than product.

There is no safer question in sales. All upside, no downside. Try it, it’s a gas.

Become one of the thousands of sales professionals receiving my latest updates on sales execution, tools, tips and more.   

Join Now!

Red chili peppers and one green chili pepper

5 Proven Ways To Blow A Sales Meeting – Part 20

By Tibor Shanto – tibor.shanto@sellbetter.ca 

In part one, we looked at how to encourage the prospect to share more meaningful information that leads to a mutually beneficial outcome. In this post we’ll look at two common, usually unintended mistakes sales people make. Today we’ll look at two other things to avoid.

Stop asking the obvious – While most sales people have bought into the idea that you catch more sales with questions than pitches, there is more to it than just “asking questions”. Buyers, influencers and executives are looking for different ideas and answers than the same old, we’ve all heard that they have more access than ever to information, what they are seeking is knowledge. The questions you ask, very much set the expectation of your worth and that of your potential offering. It is true that less sellers than ever are asking people what keeps them up at night, but many questions they hear over and over again, signal to them that they are speaking to someone no different than the last 10 sellers, even if the swag is better.

Many of the questions used by sellers, and encouraged by pundits, are very transparent in their nature and intent. All seem to be geared to get the prospect to yell “uncle”, and allow the rep to roll out their “solution”. Abetter course, is to formulate a set of questions aimed at identifying, understanding and addressing the buyer’s objectives. This however takes work, and is more difficult for many sellers and pundits, to leave your product or solution out of the entire discussion; to leave your product in the car, especially early when the buyer is evaluating you more than your solution.

The difference buyers look for is not in the product, but in how it is sold. If you are truly different, you can show it in your sales approach, but when you ask the same questions every other seller asks, what’s the difference?

Don’t focus only on the Grand Poohbah – Sales people are always told to focus on the decision maker, unfortunately that title does not appear on many business cards, directories or LinkedIn. As a result, many default to equate the executive ‘C Suite’ to decision maker. This of course drive behaviour. Sellers go hunting for executives, and when in a group or committee selling setting they focus a disproportionate amount of focus strictly on the executive, the senior person in the room, the Grand Poohbah, mistake.

There is no doubt you need to get their buy in and support, but there is a difference in approving a decision and making one, and with few exceptions, the Grand Poohbah is more likely to approve than make. They look to their teams to make the recommendation, in essence the decision, and often those people have teams doing the leg work and who have the understanding of what the product does and how. Senior people, being focused on objectives, are more likely focused on the outcomes, generally from an implementation that encompasses many products, most of which they are unaware of.

When presenting to a group, or working multiple conversations in a company, do over bet the executive, while they may like you and what you offer, they will look to their people to make a decision, and will rarely over rule them just because they like you or the colour of your widget vs. the next. Helping them understand that you can deliver outcomes that drive their objectives is great, but if the implementation team shows them they can deliver the same using something they prefer for whatever reason, you could be beat.

Think team coverage, think of selling to the organization’s objectives, and while you do what to acknowledge the Grand Poohbah and their importance, don’t forget the people who make the magic happen.

Become one of the thousands of sales professionals receiving my latest updates on sales execution, tools, tips and more.   

Join Now!

wordpress stat