F hero

Which Of These F’s Should You Give an F About?2

By Tibor Shanto – tibor.shanto@sellbetter.ca 

Sales like many other crafts, vocations, or professions, continues to evolve, or should. Some developments come along and become the rave for a while, only to fade after a time when they are proven ineffective, this is the first F, as in Fashionable. While some completely fade away, others leave a lasting impact on how people sell, and become broadly accepted, evolve to become a mainstay of professional selling; these develop over time to become Fundamentals, our second F.

Now the third F, the one you give to one of the F’s above, is not what you may think, after all we run a family friend sales professional development outfit, it in fact stands for Focus.

F heroFocus is critical to execution, and as you all by now know, success in sales is all about execution, everything else is just talk. (And there is no shortage of talk in sales).

The challenge for many is that the fundamentals are usually not exciting or easy, especially for those looking for a short cut to success. As Fashionable as Malcolm Gladwell may be, the prospect of having to invest 10,000 hours to become a master, is not an appealing recruitment statements, even if companies were willing to lend a hand. But there is no escaping that as in other professions or vocations, practitioners require continuous and repetitive practice in order to master the craft, and elevate themselves to the point where they can execute at a professional level.

Fashion on the other hand is much more exciting, appealing, and unfortunately, fleeting. We see it time after time, hot one year, dead the next, and while those developed the Fashion prosper and move on, those who followed and were then abandoned, are left with the results, or lack thereof. Just look at all the would be replacements for cold calling; Fashions have come and gone, but those Focused on Fundamentals continue to succeed, even adding some of the Fashionable remnants along the way. Witness what happened with sales 2.0, if you missed it, look at the freshly minted, ever Fashionable Sales 3.0. In fact, I am so confident that this recycling of Fashion will continue, I have already secured the domain for: www.SalesTheOcho.com.

Focus and Fundamentals requires discipline, which is not always Fashionable in sales. The problem with Fashion is two-fold, the first an most damaging is the distraction factor. Because success does take time, effort and Focus, anything that takes these elements away from nailing Fundamentals will slow your progress towards success and professionalism. Second, Fashion is rarely created for the long term, it is meant to short term and fleeting, no sooner than you load up on this year’s model, and they bring out the next. True, many fashions do come around after a time, but you only figure that out with the benefit of experience, this is why I never throw away ties, because they will come back into Fashion again. They are designed to appeal to the masses (in sales that would be the 80% in the 80/20 rule), easy to wear, and disposable. I bet we could look at some Stacks, and find some recycled Fashions or apps.

So if you give an F about your sales success, you should Focus on the Fundamentals, and avoid the time and money sucking sound of Fashion.

Become one of the thousands of sales professionals receiving my latest updates on sales execution, tools, tips and more.

Join Now!

Share
Close-up Of Businessperson Holding Stopwatch With Stack Of Coins At Desk

Time – To Let Go0

By Tibor Shanto – tibor.shanto@sellbetter.ca 

Let’s be clear, no white flags here, just a reminder that the most crucial thing to control in a winning sales career is time. As I have stated here in the past, “leads are recyclable, time is not”, if what you are doing now is not moving the opportunity or sale forward, you need to ask if it is time to move on to something that will. In my experience, this is most pronounced during the early stages of the cycle, prospecting.

Given that most sales people do not like to prospect, they should be thinking about how to optimize the dreaded task, so they can engage better with more prospects, and move on to what they really seem to like, building relationships. To optimize prospecting time there a number of things they can do, we’ll look at two here.

First is their prep for the time they have set aside for prospecting, in this case telephone prospecting (one of a number of methods they should use). Your call lists should be grouped or clustered around specific themes. This can be vertical, geographical, target size/type, or even role based. This allows you to develop a single talk track that can be leveraged across a number of calls. Allow you to highlight outcomes that are common to that day’s list, 3rd party referrals for voice mail, and more. Rather than having gaps between calls, taking away from momentum, and drastically limiting the number of calls you can make in say an hour, you can make one call after the other, building momentum, increasing your confidence, and achieving more in a given period of time. It has been shown that when you are going back and forth between two tasks, making the call, and readying for the call, you end up executing both less effectively. At the same time if you can focus on a specific task, uninterrupted, for about 52 minutes, you build efficiency. Separate the tasks, do your background work in low energy times, and do your prospecting during peak Prime Time hours.

The other area is the length of the call. A good prospecting call, where the goal is to get the prospect to agree to a formal meeting, be that phone, web, or face to face, really should not take any more than two minutes, three out the outside. In most instances, anything longer than that moves into the “diminishing return” zone.

Assuming your intro and Engage Statement (think of it as an effective value statement), capped off with an Impact Question, takes us to about 45 seconds; their answer which tees up the request for the appointment takes us to the minute mark, and now comes the fun part the objections. Each objection given – and then taken away by you, is about 20 or so seconds, remember the goal here is engagement, not an intellectual exchange. If you have read the Objection Handling Handbook, you know the first objection is a conditioned response, and by the time you get to the third one, the fate of the call is usually sealed, at times it takes four. So, we are looking at another minute to a minute and a half.

Anything after that is working against you. If they don’t want to play, all they’ll take away is how unprofessional you were, not only wasting and disrespecting their time, but your own, and no one wants to deal with that kind of rep, even when the time is right. Or worse, you are trying to sell them when your goal at the outset was to schedule a time for the actual discovery and sale.

I see so many sales people stay on the phone with someone for 10, 15 minutes, and have nothing when the call ends; well frustration, but you can’t cash that. Others achieve their goal, a prospect who agrees to engage, and then they stay on and talk themselves out of that appointment in the same call. If you do have someone agree, you should expect they may have questions, and you want to answer that question in a way that best moves the opportunity forward, and if that is a formal meeting, that’s what you should move towards. Next time you have someone agree to an appointment, and they start asking those “good” questions, simply say “That’s a great question Jim/Jill (I’m so PC), why don’t we make that first item on the agenda and give it full justice; look forward to our call Thursday, let me grab your e-mail and I’ll send an invite.” This sets you up for a great start to the discovery call, and allows you to move on to set the next appointment.

Remember, leads are recyclable – time is not – guard your time!

Become one of the thousands of sales professionals receiving my latest updates on sales execution, tools, tips and more.

Join Now!

Hunting for dollars

Walk’a Proud!2

By Tibor Shanto – tibor.shanto@sellbetter.ca 

Those of you who have participated in my events or webinars, know that early on I encourage people who prospect for a living, to take pride in what they do rather than apologize for it. I encourage them to answer with pride next time some asks what they do for a living, by saying “I am a Professional Interrupter! I interrupt people and engage them in conversations that result in their reality being better as a result of our interaction, which by the way, started as an interruption, something I am a pro at!”

The reality is that with few exceptions, most people we reach out to without prior consent, are being interrupted. Most are trying to pack 16 hours in to a 10-hour day, meaning no matter how great our offering is, it will AT FIRST be seen as an interruption. How well we transition that interruption to a conversation determines our success.

Hunting for dollarsThis is the very reason HUNTERS are at a premium in the sales world. Because there is a shortage of people who have the ABILITY and WILLINGNESS to do what it takes to bring a Status Quo business person from being disinterested on the sidelines, to being engaged, and then a happy customer.

Sure, it is easy to engage with self-declared buyers, those who have entered the market on their own, with a specific thing in mind. After having done their research and travelled 57% of the “Buying Journey” (Notice the complete absence of the word SELL or SELLING), in stealth mode, they now decloak in time to witness the beauty contest of order takers, willing to take it all off to win the sales and discounted deals for years to come. But when it comes to prospects who can benefit from your product but are hiding in the Status Quo landscape, you need more than a smile and a pretty social profile.

Many shy away from the term hunting, saying it not a pretty picture, and says something negative to and about the prospect. Please!

First no one is saying that we are hunting prospects; it’s not like we find a prospect and impale them, (that would be self-defeating. We are hunting revenue, and the best way to deliver that revenue is to help our customers and prospects.

Once you wrap your head around the concept that you are hunting revenue, you can look at your actions in a different light, and take steps many won’t, which is probably why many fail at the sales, or more specifically new sales. Once you embrace hunting you will help those missed by average sales people. Those same average sales people, and the pundits they follow do, have the advantage of numbers, and as is the case with many crowds united in their weakness, they will turn on those different than them for no other reason than that difference. If they used a more meaningful measure, like say success, like say making quota, things look different. We all know the anecdote about the three sales people pursuing the same opportunity, one win, the other two go back to their tribe empty handed, leading to hungry babies.

Be a hunter, make a difference, don’t just blend in or exist. Take pride in your abilities and results, not your associations or social circles. As in the punch line to the old baseball joke about Joe Dimagio: Walk’a Proud! 

Become one of the thousands of sales professionals receiving my latest updates on sales execution, tools, tips and more.

Join Now!

Sales_Cartoon_sales process

Never Let A Good Plan Get In The Way Of Success!2

By Tibor Shanto – tibor.shanto@sellbetter.ca 

In some sports and other skills based endeavours, for example figure skating, you can score points for artistic merit, and you also get scored on execution. Sales on the other hand is more like hockey or football (North American), while Artistic Merit is admired, execution is key, but the only measure that counts at the end, is the outcome, did we win, or, well really, what else is there? Execution is a means to an end, not an end on to itself, which is why teams and coaches use playbooks to help their teams execute better, but better execution without the results, i.e. winning a client and the revenue that leads to, does not lead to long term sales success.

Sales_Cartoon_sales processWhile I have always been a proponent of a good sales process, and having a playbook to assist and improve execution, let’s not lose sight of the overall objective: Revenue! I worry when I see sales managers and leaders put a greater emphasis on process and playbook than results. I have seen to many mistake one for the other, where sales people who delivered results were questioned about why they did not follow the process, rather than given credit for assessing the situation and acting.

You can see the opposite of this when sales people who continue to underperform, but are maintained (and rationalized) because they were “compliant”, followed the process. Don’t be that seller who continuously achieves also-ran status with high artistic merit, and low points for execution.

A process and playbook are meant to be dynamic and evolving, the only way to improve and to ensure that it is effective in the only thing that counts, Revenue, to continue to evolve it based on market realities. The market and out prospects continue to evolve, treating your playbook and process as though they are impervious to change will only lead to more work, and over time diminished results.

Playbooks are a collection of best practices, which requires we continue to test, examine, deploy, review and execute again. They are guidelines not divine declarations, every day your process does not evolve in some way, is a day you fall behind. We cringe when prospects say “because we have always done it that way”, yet we seem to be comfortable with allowing that thinking when it comes to playbooks and processes.

Too many sales managers and organization spend too much valuable time on pipeline reviews, a deep dive of ass covering. Instead they should be doing process and playbook reviews, after all what is in your pipeline is a result of how good your process is and how well it is executed. In fact, they should be doing Pipeline Previews, this allows my clients to look ahead, and understand which elements of their playbook and process will help move the sale forward, and which need to evolve to ensure they win the sale. Good execution of a bad process or playbook means nothing at the end of the day; may look good, but little more.

Become one of the thousands of sales professionals receiving my latest updates on sales execution, tools, tips and more.

Join Now!

Red closed door behind open doors, isolated on white background.

Closing Is Easy0

By Tibor Shanto – tibor.shanto@sellbetter.ca 

One of the most common things I hear from sellers is “Get me in front of the right guy, and I can close them”. Big deal, so could any monkey dressed in the right suit, that’s why the big money in B2B sales is made by those who can actually get in front of the right guy long before the closing monkeys show up, those who can OPEN.

Closing opportunities that were initiated by the buyer themselves is cute, but is it enough? When asked if they can meet or exceed quota relying strictly on deals that were initiated by the buyer, most admit the answer is no. In addition to those who come to them, they have to identify, qualify, prospect and engage with potential buyers who left on their own, would not have stayed out of the market in the current timeframe.

When A Tree Falls In The Forest

When you ask sales people or organizations, whether they could make or exceed quota by closing only opportunities initiated by the buyers themselves, and most admit, no. Meaning they have to go out and prospect buyers, who left to their own, would stay on the sidelines, and remain oblivious to any social activity, messaging, or any other on line activity. It is very much like the tree falling in the forest. If the buyer is not online, but instead in their businesses, their shops, trucks, or offices, doing their thing, then they can’t see or interact with anything you may dangle out there. This, by the way, represents about 70% of any defined market, if not more.

Sure, one alternative is to double down, increase your efforts to entice and succeed with those buyers who are interacting with what you’re dangling. But we also have to remember that these buyers are rarely monogamous. They are visiting all your competitors’ sites, and playing footsie with all they’re dangling. In a “good enough” world, you all begin to look the same at about the 67% – 70% marker in the journey, leaving price as the big differentiator.

Back To The Start

Openers, know how to identify and speak with those 70% who are entrenched on the sideline. They can shape the thinking of the buyer much more so than one could at the 67% marker. While any intelligent buyer will compare you to others, Openers know how to frame the opportunity in ways that will directly influence how those buyers will filter your competitors.

The risk these days is that everyone is so fixated on closing, they overlook the need for Openers, placing all their early cycle success in means that are not delivering. While many bought into the SDR wave, stats about SaaS sales success can be scary by any standard. One reason again is that the emphasis is not opening the opportunity, creating a base for success, and without that foundation, it is hard to build.

Unfortunately, the discussion has eroded into a question of style, social vs. traditional. But impact has been deeper, as many who shun traditional prospecting, say telephone prospecting or cold calling, also abandon the skill of opening, as that step is left entirely to the buyer. Time to focus on why we do something, not just the how. For real sellers, the why is about the Open.

Become one of the thousands of sales professionals receiving my latest updates on sales execution, tools, tips and more.

Join Now!

sell-more-konrath

More Sales, Less Time: by Jill Konrath – Book Review0

By Tibor Shanto – tibor.shanto@sellbetter.ca 

In her latest book, More Sales, Less Time: Surprisingly Simple Strategies for Today’s Crazy-Busy Sellers, continues what one describe as her journey through sales. Starting by conquering “Big Companies”, then in “SNAP Selling” helping sellers understand and appreciate the world of “crazy-busy buyers”. In “Agile Selling” sellers then get a vision of how agility can help them improve sales. So it only makes sense that the next element to explore is time. It has always been a fact that the one thing A level sellers do differently is time. While everyone on the planet gets 24 hours at the strike of midnight, how they choose to use, invest or spend those 24 hours, is what differentiates them from the also-rans. And that is what Jill unpacks in this book, and in the process helping “Crazy-busy Sellers”.

As with her other works, Jill keeps things real, not only by dealing with the real challenges faced by sales professionals today, which is exactly where the book kicks off, with the challenge. But also, because she leverages her own direct experience. There is nothing worse than sales books where authors can’t relate their own experience, only share observation.

sell-more-konrathJill with this book puts you in the game, not in the stands, making it easier and more likely that the reader will succeed in implementing ideas in the book. Starting with the role of distraction in our day to day success. Just working through the “Distraction Quiz”, had me thinking not only about some of the sales teams I have worked with, but how I roll through my day. By exploring how, where and why our time gets “sucked”, we can then turn to recovering what Jill calls lost time.

My goal is not to give a play by play here, that’s best done by reading the book. I want to make sure that you go out and not just read this “manual for sales success”, in fact if you apply the many things you’ll learn through the course of reading it, it could also be viewed as life success, since your life runs on time. BTW, the appendixes are worth the price of the book alone, but given the rest of the book, they truly are a bonus.

What sets the book apart is the author and her ability to look at elements of sales that others usually miss, or misunderstand, and there by miss its significance to sales and your success. Jill breaks it down, backs it with both experience and research. For me this not only helped me look at some familiar things in a different way, but caused me to explore elements in greater detail, leading to further research; so, it becomes a platform for further learning, better selling.

The biggest challenge sales organizations, leaders, and front line reps face today is productivity, or a lack thereof, one of the core causes to that is where and how sales people and organizations Spend and Use time. Jill Knorath’s More Sales, Less Time: Surprisingly Simple Strategies for Today’s Crazy-Busy Sellers, helps readers with that very core elements. Take the time to read it and benefit from it.

Become one of the thousands of sales professionals receiving my latest updates on sales execution, tools, tips and more.

Join Now!

Two IT spceialists working with a computer

Do Buyers Care?4

By Tibor Shanto – tibor.shanto@sellbetter.ca 

Last week I posted a piece on LinkedIn, based on discussions at CEB’s Sales & Marketing Thought Leader Roundtable this past August, titled “Why Do We Need Sales?”, Exploring the relationship between marketing and sales, and how it needs to evolve and change with relation to the markets they serve. The response on LinkedIn was positive, with the exception of one person who missed the concept of “metaphor” (you always need one to prove the rule). One response, from Leanne Hoagland-Smith, got me thinking about the issue from a different perspective.

Lee, pointed out that “97.7% of all US businesses having under 20 employees, marketing is truly part of the overall sales process.” That perspective is leads to a different question:

Does all this naval gazing and philosophising about sales and marketing role, contributions, hand-offs, and all the sleepless nights spent pondering the nuanced difference between account based marketing/selling vs. key account selling/marketing.

Picking up from Lee’s comment, it is probably true that a vast majority if not all those 97.7% don’t have the luxury of having two people for the roles, and more likely that the person in charge of sales and marketing is usually wearing a host of other functional hats. I am betting that they don’t set time aside to consider the fine points of the discussion. It is safe to say that that these companies, especially for the 23 million businesses that are “nonemployer businesses”, that they need sales, because without them they’d go bankrupt.

Perhaps the next question should be what do we need sales to do? Why? Because it seems that of the things that prevent sales in small companies, are similar to those things that get in the way in big companies. Sure, there are factors that are unique to big companies, unnecessary complexity created by their own companies vs. the market. You would think then if that barrier was removed, as it is in small companies (unless the owner’s nephew attended a social selling webinar), you would see an improvement in how they sell, but there isn’t. Bringing us back to execution.

The biggest barrier to sales success is not sales people’s inability or willingness to sing Kumbaya with their marketing cousins, it is their inability to execute those things that have to be done to win the deal. Which is an interesting parallel.

You often read about small business owners or entrepreneurs and the actions they are willing to take, often going over and above, to build their businesses and to compete with the big boys, even global players. As you explore it a bit further, what you can conclude is that one of the reasons small businesses succeed, is they don’t waste time worrying about things that don’t contribute, and spend their time doing everything they can to win. The lack of roles, and inability to pass the buck and duck accountability, leaves them with one choice, getting it done.

It would be interesting to get the buyer’s view on this, I suspect they would base their experience on the title on a business card, and more on the quality of the engagement, independent of whether it was sales, marketing, or the garage guard.

Become one of the thousands of sales professionals receiving my latest updates on sales execution, tools, tips and more.

Join Now!

no-rules

There Are No Rules In Sales3

By Tibor Shanto – tibor.shanto@sellbetter.ca 

It’s hard not to laugh sometimes when I hear sales people say something like “Well, it’s supposed to go like this…”, or “I was told to do it that way, cause when we do that the prospects do…” But instead I am empathetic to their plight and innocence. Empathetic, because some manager or pundit told them that if they took a specific step or action, the prospect would react in some specific way. But we all know there are no rules in sales, especially rules that prospect will behave in any way just because of what we may do.

Now pundits have books to sell, and managers have their own agenda, a common one they share is their need for you as a sales rep to act on what they say, hard to do if they mentioned that there are no guarantees, usually because there are no rules.

Studies continue to show that less 20% of Sales Qualified Leads actually close, call that handshake to close, less than 20% – so even if pretended there are rules, they clearly don’t work if the measure is success. I suspect that that as long as sales continues to dependent on interaction between two or more people, rules are hard to articulate or impose.

no-rulesI keep hearing, buyers have changed, and one reason for that is their greater access to information, information about you, your competitors, and if you’re active on Facebook, where you had and what you had for dinner Friday night. You know what else they have access to, sales and sales related info. You think only sellers buy and read sales books; you think that sellers are the only ones who can subscribe to sales blogs and update. I bet more buyers read sales blogs than sellers who read blogs about purchasing, or role specific sites that speak to the different functions covered by the 5.4 people likely to be involved in your sale. There are no secrets.

With buyers who have gone through a few buying cycles, are likely more familiar with “Seller Personas” than many sellers are with buyer personas. In fact, I know buyers who place bets on which category of sales the next person to visit will wear. Based on what they see, they too adapt a persona, just to mess with and see where the seller goes with it. The only time they are genuine when dealing with a genuine individual.

To be genuine, you need to understand what you are doing well, here defined as things that people respond to, and what is not getting you traction with real buyers. By real, we mean, not exclusively price driven, and does indeed buy in a realistic timeframe from when you initially engaged. Since people differ, leading to differences in experience, your best shot is to commit to a formal process of reviewing all the opportunities that qualify to be active in your pipeline. As you gather and grow data, you will be able to bell curve the data and begin to see what works more often, and what doesn’t. As you approach similar situations, you will be able to use those things that have worked in similar situations in the past. Think of it as trial and error with the unfair advantage of data and experience. It will take a bit of work in the form of analysis, but given the apps and tools available today, gathering the inputs is easy. I guess the only rule may be that there are no silver bullets or codes to crack, just act-review-apply learning. A simple but effective rule.

Become one of the thousands of sales professionals receiving my latest updates on sales execution, tools, tips and more.

Join Now!

Taking a look at oneself

The Easiest Person To Lie To Is Yourself0

By Tibor Shanto – tibor.shanto@sellbetter.ca 

I hear a lot of talk in sales about lying, not so much about how they may lie to win business, but in broader terms. We have all heard the use of “buyers are liars”, or its popular cousin “sellers are liars”. While there are probably liars in both camps, undoubtedly in the same proportion and distribution as in the general population, and likely less among successful sales people.

Taking a look at oneselfWhile not limited to sales people, the worst lie sales people tell, are the ones they tell themselves. This is not to say that these people are dishonest, but rather, that they don’t want (or are unable) to deal with the reality facing them. One example was highlighted in a recent piece about pipelines, where sales people lie to themselves about the quality of individual opportunities, and by extension, they lie to themselves, their managers and companies about the state of the entire pipeline, and the ultimate revenue delivered. That lie then forces them to lie about the necessity to prospect, after all they tell themselves and their manager, “Just look all the things I have going on in my pipeline.”

One way to not mislead ones’ self is to have a realistic plan for your sales, both long term and short term. Beyond specific activities, this needs to include an overall annual territory plan; key account plans; prospecting plans; and most importantly at a minimum monthly activity plans, although it would not kill you to have one that continuously covers the next two weeks.

It is always a good idea, and learning opportunity to have your plan validated, if you don’t have a manager, share and review it with the owner or senior stakeholder. Once there is agreement that you have a workable plan, a plan that starts with your quota, and then working backwards from there, you can map out critical points, and based on your conversion rates, how many opportunities you should be working on at any given time. We use an Activity Calculator tool, that helps sellers and managers to optimize this process, but only if they A) know the inputs; B) don’t lie to themselves about the numbers they don’t track or know, (e-mail me if you’d like to try it and use it). This exercise will be hard for those who are already lying to themselves by proclaiming “sales is not a numbers game”. Given that quotas and conversions are numbers, and you’ll need those inputs to plan your success.

There are many other lies, one of my favourites is the wireless rep who had to drive a battery across town right at the time he was scheduled to prospect. You can just hear it now, “Ya, I know my pipeline is low, but hey I saved that account by delivering the battery real quick.” I’ll bet no quicker than a $25 taxi could have, while he found new clients to save. But avoiding an Activity he didn’t like called for a good lie.

Once you lie to yourself, it takes no extra effort to lie to others, and once you do that, it’s all downhill. I know it’s easy, but stop lying to yourself about your activities, pipeline or success. Save that for January, when you abandon your New Year’s resolution.

Become one of the thousands of sales professionals receiving my latest updates on sales execution, tools, tips and more.

Join Now!

the-perfect-close

The Perfect Close – Book Review0

By Tibor Shanto – tibor.shanto@sellbetter.ca 

Years ago, I read a stat that suggested most sales people do not read even one sales book a year, and that was before access to sales blogs and curators of blogs, and a host of other sources (of dubious quality). While some may put this off to laziness, it may also be that the “consumer”, here sales people, are more discerning than given credit, and realize that many of the books they ignore are indeed worth ignoring. Like many of their buyers, the discerning seller has grown weary of advice, observations and untested theory, from talking heads who not sold anything in years but their books. Sellers are looking for real world, practical executable insights, by real world practitioner. Which brings us to in The Perfect Close: The Secret to Closing Sales, by James Muir.

the-perfect-closeDon’t let the title fool you, this is not a book full of closing tricks like the Ben Franklin Close or The Columbo Close. It is a straight forward means and process that sellers of all products can implement, without having to resort to pressure or tricks. It focuses on moving the sale from stage to stage in a practical manner, and involves two questions. It can be put into practice by both seasoned veterans of the trade or new comers. The central reason for that is the author, and the fact that he spends his days in the real sales world.

James Muir is a professional sales trainer, author, speaker and coach, who has excelled both as a front line sales rep, and manager, shattering records in the process. One thing all successful people have said, is to model yourself after the most successful in the field. That is you opportunity with James and The Perfect Close. His guidance comes from experience and the school of hard knocks. James has an extensive background in healthcare where he has sold-to and spoken for the largest names in technology and healthcare including HCA, Tenet, Catholic Healthcare, Banner, Dell, IBM and others. Three decades of not just experience, but success, has given James a fresh and practical perspective on what works in real-life and what doesn’t. And now you can benefit directly from that in this book.

The Perfect Close represents the tested and proven best practices for winning in today’s competitive sales world. It picks up where many others leave off. It is easy to say that “traditional” closing techniques do not work and can harm your efforts, James outlines an alternative that works, one that makes your buyer feel educated when buying from you, see you as a true facilitator and consultant, and allow you remain on emotionally higher ground. The bonus is that the approach is a proven and repeatable process for advancing sales that can be used in any kind of sale at any given stage. All this will allow you to close more business, usually in a shorter timeframe.

Beyond the very practical advice and a practical path to execution, the book has something many of the pre-fab pundit produced books lack, passion. James’ passion for sales and helping others sell better comes through in every chapter. This makes it easy for the reader to absorb the solid methods presented. Don’t let the title fool you, this is not a gimmicky close book, it is about the steps sales professionals must take, right from the start, and along the way to win more customers. James outlines the steps it takes to win no matter what you sell, or how long you have been selling. He introduces the “why”, the “what”, and the “how” for each step along the journey. This book is fun to read. You’ll find yourself revisiting elements, each time improving your execution. Buy this book for yourself, your team, and if you have a friend who sells that you would like to see do better. Don’t take my word for it, buy it, read it, enjoy it, implement it, and profit from it!

Become one of the thousands of sales professionals receiving my latest updates on sales execution, tools, tips and more.

Join Now!

wordpress stat