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Prospecting Dynamics0

By Tibor Shanto – tibor.shanto@sellbetter.ca

Proactive Prospecting Summer – Part 6

In this segment of Proactive Prospecting Summer, we look at the importance of the unspoken in prospecting calls.

Telephone prospecting, after all, is an exercise in communication. If we take the experts at their word, communication is roughly 60% body language, the one thing we don’t have working for us on the phone, or e-mail, or LinkedIn; 30% intonation and expression, and only 10% the words used to communicate. Yet most of the effort by sellers in prospecting is focused on words “the messaging”, and little effort to compensate for the 60% not available to at the time of the game. Which is a lot like getting the best warhead, then placing it on a delivery mechanism that is bound to miss the target.

When we call someone unexpectedly, unscheduled, we need to ensure that we are cognizant and balancing for environment, on both ends of the call. What’s gone on before the call, going on during the call, and things likely to happen as a result of the call? Managing all that, is managing the dynamics of the call, take a look.

Next Step

How to prepare, manage and execute is dealt with in much greater detail in the Proactive Prospecting Program available on-line at Sales Gravy University.

 

Honestly

Lie To Me Like Everyone Else Does0

By Tibor Shanto – tibor.shanto@sellbetter.ca 

Revenue, finding it, winning it keeping it, is more than sales, and certainly more than just one says. Winning growing and retaining clients (the source of revenue), may be centered around sales, but involves other key groups. Some like marketing, may not have as much direct contact with prospects/clients as customer support, implementation and others. All have an opportunity to reinforce the relationship, or blow it, making each and every interaction and exchange with a client. I know there were a number of accounts I lost because of an experience a client had with support; just as have landed bigger deals and kept them because of things others did for my clients. All this makes each encounter key, and makes one wonder why some companies have their representatives say some of the things they say to customers, and to know that they actually paid someone to teach these mistakes to their teams.

One challenge arises when there is a disconnect between what people say, and how they act, I guess one can call it incongruity

Empathy Is Not Just A Word

We all know empathy is central to interactions and by extension sales. But empathy is more than a word, it is more than an ingredient you measure and add in the right amounts at the right times during a conversation. It is very much the behavior that defines the word, not just saying it. You can’t say you are empathetic to a buyer or their concerns, and then behave in an opposite manner.

We have all had the opportunity to be screwed by a provider, I am not saying wireless, but as an example. Instead of dealing with the issue at hand they always apologize and empathize, I am sure it is like pages 27 to 32 in the work book.

“no matter what the prospect/customer says, just say ‘I apologize Mr. Shanto, I am sorry you feel, I can understand you feeling that way’ and then let them continue.”

You know they don’t mean, only because they don’t take any action to change things, just agree with your feelings, and apologize for how you feel, but not what they did to make you feel that way.

This is a challenge for sellers, because they too say things the prospect does not see them act on, which just confirms the whole mess.

What’s funny about the whole thing, is many companies, for example wireless, will do this to “how can I help – I apologize and see why you feel that way”; then do nothing, you bring up your next point, and they go right back to “yes, I can see that – I apologize and see why you feel that way”, and keep it going for a long time without resolution, until you drop the F-Bomb. Then it all becomes about that, the F-Bomb. So, it is perfectly fine for them to do it to you, but not for you to talk about it.

Honestly

The other words that cause prospects and buyers to be cautious is when a sales rep or support rep, says in response to a question the prospect/customer has says “Well to be honest,…” Hang on a minute, does that mean everything you said prior to this was not honest?

I know it is just a turn of phrase, but buyers hear these things over and over, and have come to take the words at face value, with the expectation that nothing will result of the conversation.

Why not just leave these expressions out? You want them to feel they are being empathized with, show them, act the part, don’t just talk to it because it is on page 27 of the work book. Align you actions with your words and people will see you are honest, you may not always be perfect, you may not always be spot on, but you will be perceived as being a lot more honest and customer focused, then just talking about it and then walking another way.

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Portrait of a businessman giving a business card

What Do You Sell?0

By Tibor Shanto – tibor.shanto@sellbetter.ca 

Proactive Prospecting Summer – Part 4

In this part of the Proactive Prospecting Summer series, we look at improving how we communicate early in the call.  Clear concise communication is key to sales, especially in the pressure packed first few seconds of an unscheduled prospecting call, yes, a cold call. Yet it is interesting how many sellers fail to effectively communicate the simplest concepts at this crucial stage of the sale.

Try this experiment, if you are a manager or team leader, next time you have team together in a room, or call, ask them to respond to the following question: “What do you sell?” If you need to set it up, tell them the setting is a trade show and the person asking the question could be a viable prospect, so the answer counts. After a few minutes, you can start capturing their answers.

Go ahead, try it now, we’ll be here, I gotta check my e-mail anyways.

Good, you’re back, gave it a go? Here are the types of answers I get when I do this with teams:

“I sell…

Software
Hardware
Copiers
Transportation services
Marketing Automation
CRM
Recruiting
IT Integration
Engineering

Occasionally I hear:

“We sell solutions”, but when I ask them to elaborate, they do not go to the problem they “solve” (as in solution), they revert to product.

Others will offer up “efficiencies”, a top 5 “Sales Empty Calorie Word”. While it sounds cool, it means nothing to a prospect who has heard a thousand times before. If you don’t shape it in some way that they can visualize in their business, words like efficiency, productivity, solutions, work-flow, and others are devoid of meaning, and can in fact hurt you in a prospecting call.

I recently worked with a leading telco provider, and in doing this and a related exercise answering the question “why do people buy from you and your company?”. The Alpha rep in the group offered up, “We sell productivity, that’s why people buy from us, we make them more productive.” I said “great, give me an example.” Still confident, he fired by “we make them productive through the efficiencies we bring”. I asked for an example of the efficiencies their clients realise, here is what I got “We increase efficiencies for them by making them more productive.” “In what way?” I asked, and it literally circled like that for five minutes. How long do you think a prospect will give him on an unsolicited and unscheduled call (or e-mail, or InMail)? Exactly.

If you look at the list above, it is all correct, but it really relates to what your company “manufactures” or “produces”, or from the buyers point of view, it is literally the “deliverables”, the stuff that will be in the boxes when it arrives on “location”. But buyers are more interested in the impact the “deliverables” will have on their business. Buyers, especially economical buyers, set out to achieve business results, the “deliverables” are just a means to an end, and for most economical buyers (not the implementers, or the people who get to “push the buttons” every day, the means are a distant third to the outcome.

Many cold callers try to explain what they do at the top of the call, and then wonder why “there is no interest”. Likely because that is not what the buyer was thinking about at the time they called. But if you move to defining things in a way that aligns with the outcomes they are looking for, that are similar to what you current clients are already achieving. So go ask them what is different in their world vis-à-vis their goals, issues, risk, reputation, cost structures, market share, anything other than something that sounds like a deliverable.

As a seller, you need to translate the question “What do you sell?” to “What are they looking to achieve?” The answer has to be driven by the outcomes they are looking for. How will their world be different after they buy from you? That’s what you sell.

You can drill down on this exercise, and make it more specific to your business by exploring the on-demand version of the Proactive Prospecting Program on Sales Gravy University.

PPP On Demand
Hypos

Hypothetically Speaking2

By Tibor Shanto – tibor.shanto@sellbetter.ca 

It is easy to understand why some, especially in business, don’t like hypotheticals, they want to deal with facts, and tangible things that impact their business. Many view hypotheticals as just a distraction from things they need to deal in the real world. But it is precisely because it is a distraction, something that takes them away from the challenges they are dealing with that make hypotheticals a good tool for sellers.

Often, especially early in discovery, it takes a bit of an effort to pull back the layers and get to the substantive issues that can impact a prospects business, due to previous “abuse” by lesser sellers that preceded you, prospects may be a bit guarded. They may be reluctant to share key information that could actually help you formulate the right plan for them. A bigger challenge can be to take them in a direction they had not considered, may have misconceptions about, or areas they have avoided due to perceived risk, even if we do see it as such, the prospect is driving this process.

Hypotheticals allow you to engage around these areas without the associated risk. Some sellers, firm in their conviction that they have a great “solution” for the prospect, will ignore the buyer’s reluctance, hoping the strength of their solution will prevail. It may, but only if the prospect is open to the topic, but if not, as is the case for most buyers, their solution does not see the light of day, and it’s all for not. Framing the discussion in a hypothetical, especially a hypothetical outside the company, allows they buyer to tip their tows in the water without the sense of commitment of a head on question presentation. They don’t have to own a hypothesis, the sellers does, if they don’t agree, no harm, if it starts to resonate, all the better.

Hypotheticals are also a great way to get people to think outside their current lane. This is especially powerful if you are dealing with a buyer who has traveled all alone the first “57% of their buying journey”. By the time they get to you (I know you think you got to them), they have firm impressions if not opinions or more; to change their direction, to get them to take an alternate path to the one they are down, you’re much better off using hypothetical than facts. This is not to say we ignore the facts, but if they are not willing to have the discussion, the facts as you see them may or will not see the light of day. Starting them off with a hypothetical allows them to step outside their lane without all the associated risk.

HyposHypotheticals will get the prospect to share facts (pains if you like that type of thing), you otherwise would not have discovered. One of mu favourites is to ask a prospect a forward looking hypothetical. Placing the scenario into the future allows them to escape the shackles of today, and go to a happier place in the future, a future that is sunny and bright. I start by asking:

“I am curious Julie, if we were meeting here, 18 months from now, and you were happily telling me that your team had hit a Grand Slam, what would that look like?”

It may take them a minute to get going, as they start their journey to feeling what a Grand Slam feels like, but if you don’t interrupt, they will get going, and tell you all the things they want to be real 18 months from now. You’ll be amazed what they will share, as long as you let them. When they have shared their vision of a Grand Slam, I follow with:

“That’s a great vision Julie, and I can see why that would indeed be a Grand Slam; so help me understand why we are not there now?”
And that is when they will share with you all the things they see being in their way. I find that they usually share a number of things I have a “solution” for. This is when we move from the hypothetical to the real world, to the sale.

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Slow and low

Slow & Low – The Right Recipe For Great Prospecting0

By Tibor Shanto – tibor.shanto@sellbetter.ca 

Next week both Canada and the US celebrate their respective independence days, which means barbecues galore, and as you may have guessed, an opportune lesson for cold callers everywhere. Most cold callers, carnivores and vegetarians, make the same common errors in executing their telephone prospecting calls, many of these mistakes contribute to their lack of success, making the whole thing a further mess.

Part of the negative cycle revolves around the fact that they are way too nervous, anticipating the worst, as a result many rush the call, leading to the outcome they feared. There are a couple of specific things telephone prospectors do that if approached differently would help overcome the challenge, alter the results and their view of cold calling; once mastered, they will find the whole thing much more productive and profitable. This is where the barbeque lesson comes in, making a good prospecting call is like making a good southern brisket, slow and low.

First thing that happens to nervous callers is they speed up their speaking, going faster than they normally would, and way faster than what makes for an effective prospecting call. This triggers a similar response from the buyer, they get nervous at the barrage of words coming at them, and they look for the exit even quicker. Ever deliver you into (at a nervous pace) only to have the prospects ask, “I’m sorry, who is this, what’s this about?” And before you can answer, you’re on your heels, and the call ends without engagement.

Slow and lowSlow down Man, it’s not a race. I know most want the call to be over more than they want the appointment, but is not about completing the activity (fast), it’s about engaging with potential prospect. Slowing down takes practice, repeated and out loud. Slow down your breathing before you pick up the phone and maintain the pace through the call. If you’re not too macho, get a metronome, and stick to the rhythm. I know sounds silly, till you start connecting with prospects and getting appointments.

The low part has to do with voice and pitch. When callers get nervous their voice gets higher, I’ve heard grown men sound more like their sisters than themselves. This makes it harder for the buyer to comprehend what the caller is saying, and obscures their message. Think about some of the great radio voices or TV voice overs, think about James Earl Jones famous “this is CNN”. As with slowing down, this comes down to practicing, and again out loud.

In a tension filled call, any element of distraction can be a negative and work against you, when you sound squeaky and speak fast, the two just compound in a way that makes it hard to achieve your objective.

One overlooked way to help with these two factors is to have a well prepared script, this will reduce the nervousness, and with practice limit the speed and pitch. Get over the self-imposed fear of scripts, and you’re a long way towards overcoming this and other prospecting roadblocks. Next time you pick up the phone, think brisket, slow and low.

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Difference Is In the Eyes Of The Prospect8

By Tibor Shanto – tibor.shanto@sellbetter.ca

There is a lot of talk about differentiation in sales, whether that is at the product level, sales technique level or other factors. Some difference is good, some goes a bit far, unfortunately most of seems to fall short. The main reason is that most vendors and sellers spend time and effort to differentiate themselves from other products, companies, or sales people. As with other miscues in sales, the problem is that most of the effort excludes the only element that counts, the buyer.

Buying and selling are very subjective experiences. While there are reams of tools and means for capturing requirements, allowing buyers to better understand what will help them achieve their objectives, presenting a clear and objective process, there is a range of undercurrents that allows a lot of subjectivity to creep in to the decision. Who among us has not lost a deal where the we were a perfect fit based on requirements. Or conversely won a deal, where on the face of things we were deficient and less cost effective than an alternative. The reason is simple and human, people are very subjective, (and buyers are people), and as such will make decisions using more than just logic, leading to the reality that difference, like beauty, is in the eyes of the beholder.

While many may not like it, but one advantage to having multiple decision makers or stakeholders in the deal, is that it can naturalize subjectivity, allowing us to better present and leverage real differences we may have. I say we may have, because most leading products have very few real differences, especially in the eyes of buyers. What some vendors think is really different, may not be that important to the market, which is likely why the others have avoided it. With “sameness” rampant in products, the other difference is how you sell, and by extension your sales process. The challenge here is that most people sell in a very similar way, leading to only superficial differences that even the least experienced buyer can see through.

Once you accept that difference is in the eye of the prospect, and not something you can ram down their throat or post on a billboard, you can then switch your approach to understanding how they see themselves and their reality as being different than others they are looking at. Let’s be clear, it may not always be true that what the buyers are looking for is all that different than their neighbor’s, but, we are dealing with buyer perception, not necessarily reality as we see it.

The only option is to have the prospect articulate what they see as being different. And while most sellers will tell you that they are doing that, when observed in action, they are still very much anchored to their product, and features they feel are “solutions” for the buyer’s “pain”. Presentations are geared to highlighting the “vendor’s difference”, rather than the difference the buyer is trying to achieve in their business. Presentations limit our ability to get the prospect to help us differentiate ourselves, mostly because they are centered around the product, and things we believe we are “solving”, that in turn make us different.

Especially early in a cycle, leave you your product, presentations, preconceptions in the car; go in armed only with questions that will help you uncover the buyer’s objectives, and impacts they are looking to deliver to their business. This sounds easy, and is often met by “we’re already doing that”, until we examine the questions many sellers ask, and the reality of some first and early meetings. Remember that the “difference” starts long before you engage, so how you engage, and what happens at your first encounter is key. You may think your PowerPoint is different, but it is still PowerPoint.

If you stay focused on the impacts and outcomes, you will start to establish a difference. When you get the prospect to share their objective, avoid the instinct to map those back to your product. First, drill down on those objectives, why those, how will that change their business, what are related risks, and more. This will allow you to demonstrate your Subject Matter Expertise, and help the prospect validate their direction and means of getting there. If that direction and means are less than optimal, help the buyer reorient their thinking, reorient their direction and path. Now that’s different, especially in a world where sellers are not experts, and seek the safety of “the customer is always right” over pushing back, getting the buyer to see things differently, help them down an alternate path to alternate results. (Easy Kellyanne, it’s just sales). When prospects start their journey, they are more focused on the end than the means, which is why your product, solution, or whatever, is not that important in the early stage.

With difference being in the eye of the prospect, the more we take ourselves and our product out of the early phases of the sales, the more different a prospect will see us; the more we can make them think instead of listen, the greater the difference in experience, leading to different experience and results for both the buyer and the seller.

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Rehearse 2

What Is Your Customer Buying?0

By Tibor Shanto – tibor.shanto@sellbetter.ca 

Most sales people are good at telling you what they sell, not necessarily communicating how the customer will be ahead as a result, but they are good at telling. Regularly scheduled role play in team meeting will usually help you get ahead of that. While this will help with the delivery and to ensure that they are delivering the message, it does not ensure the message is right.

This is not always the fault of the front line rep; they will usually run with some version of what they are given. The version they run with will be determined by which camp of the ever popular ‘80/20’ they are in. The 20% is not the worry, they will take what they are given, understand how it will help drive objectives, and then enhance it based on their experience and past successes. The challenge is the 80%, whose version will be altered and diluted, delivering less results, leading the 80 Percenters to say “This doesn’t work, I just gonna do what got me so far.” This is where having role play as part of your routine once a month at the minimum, will allow the sharing of best practices, and practice. This coupled with the observations made while you are riding along to real prospect calls, should allow you to lead things in the right direction.

Once you have a couple rounds of role play and practice, spice things up a bit, and have your sales people articulate what their prospect is buying and why – rather than what they are selling and why.

Don’t be surprised if what you hear is the mirror opposite of what they said “they were selling”. In fact, many managers may themselves miss that, because they grew up the same system, and have become tone deaf to the message and have fallen victim to same message related brain washing as their reps. If you have the type customer base that will indulge, I would ask one to sit in and provide feedback, and I would also have you marketing participate so they can be hands on.

Going further, I suggest coupling the role play of why someone did not buy, with an actual opportunity review of the opportunity lost. In most instances sales people will point to price or product fit as reasons for loosing. At the same time, third party companies who are paid to carry out post mortems on lost opportunities consistently find that the real reason had more to do with reps’ inability to understand what the prospect was trying to do.

The best way to help reps change is to have them articulate what their prospect is buying, if they cannot do that, you can bet they will not be able to sell them. Once you can get them to do that, you can introduce a line of discovery that encourages prospects. A continuous rotation of role play: “What we sell/What they buy” will ensure you are offering real value to buyers, and success for your reps.

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Lean Com

Lean Communication for Sales – Book Review0

By Tibor Shanto – tibor.shanto@sellbetter.ca 

Communication is central to sales success; we have all seen brilliant people with vast knowledge who are challenged in sharing their knowledge due to an inability to communicate.  Closer to home, we have all seen how the quality of communication can make or break a deal.  All the more reason why Jack Malcolm’s new book Lean Communication for Sales, is a must read for sales people and their managers.

Straight off the top, Jack posses the following question: Would your prospects and customers pay to talk to you?  Regardless of how you answer this question today, you will be in a better position to answer and act after you read this book.

Jack how and why to make the answer affirmative every time.  The only way prospects and clients will pay to talk to you, is if they know you will bring them useful ideas to improve their business outcomes without wasting their time.

One of the recurring themes in the B2B sales world is the idea that salespeople are an endangered species, because buyers have so many alternative sources that they can tap into, to get the information they need to make the right purchase decision. But with the entire world clamoring for their attention, it’s no wonder that buyers put off talking to salespeople for as long as they can.

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In fact, it is precisely because there is so much information available and so many voices clamoring for the attention of your target prospect, they will welcome a trusted voice who will give them just what they need when they need it without wasting their precious time.

Jack Malcolm’s Lean Communication for Sales, will help you to develop and become that trusted voice, by showing how to communicate more value in fewer words—and become a valuable asset to your prospects. As a B2B sales professional, your role is to deliver the information and insights buyers need to make the best possible decision.

Lean Communication for Sales will help you communicate higher value with less waste by applying the principles of lean thinking to your sales communication process. You will be able to apply 9 powerful ideas as simply as ABCD:

  1. Add value: Leave your customers better off by Answering the Question that is on every buyer’s mind, and using Outside-in Thinking to communicate what they value the most.
  2. Brevity: Save time and boost credibility by putting your Bottom Line Up Front, and use the So What filter to eliminate clutter.
  3. Clarity: Ensure that your message is heard, understood, and remembered through Transparent Structure, Candor, and User-friendly Language.
  4. Dialogue: Co-create value with your buyer through effective dialogue, using Just-in-time Communication and Lean Listening.

The idea is simple, talk less, sell more: executing is a bit different.  Now you can improve the quality of your customer conversations with Lean Communication for Sales!

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Megaphone

Sales Communication Therapy0

By Tibor Shanto – tibor.shanto@sellbetter.ca 

There is a lot of talk about what sales is and the core skills and habits required for consistent success in all types of markets.  It has been said that “nothing happens until there is a sale”, but you do have to respect that there is no sale made without first prospecting or engaging.  Others will insist that most essential ability is the building and growing relationship; there is the group for whom it is all about product expertise; then there are those who put the ability to stay positive despite the negatives as the critical element of sale success.  For me, it is probably some shifting combination of these and other skills and attributes, but none are as important or critical to ongoing success as the ability and the art of communication.

By communication, I do not mean the gift of gab, more specifically, the ability to foster and facilitate communication, not only between buyer and seller, but internally within the buying organization or team, and internally with all the people potentially impacting the outcome of the sale.  While the gift of gab is often recognized, the other elements of communication are often overlooked by hiring managers and organizations, but if you step back, more sales are lost because communication was not fostered than by people who were not great orator.

The good news is that facets of communication are a learned skill and ability, meaning that you can take steps to better communicate in writing, when speaking to people one-on-one or as a group.  Sales people can be taught to be multi lingual, giving them the ability to speak to different people involved in the decision, all with different filters, different criteria, in effect speaking different languages to communicate important and specific information to people who view, evaluate and interpret things in their own unique way.

Mode of communication is key as well, most sales people believe the world is like them, so if they communicate predominantly by e-mail, so must everyone else, which is just false.  So in addition to being multi lingual, you need to be multi-modal as a way of ensuring that your signal can and is pick up by their uniquely individual receiver.  One reason Social Selling is not all that big a deal for many, is that they understood the importance a multi-modal approach, and view social selling as form of or communication channel.  I guess some were surprised to have a response to their communication, and felt they were on to something new.  Doesn’t matter how you get to the party, as long as you got there.

But most importantly, effective communication is when the prospect willingly shares information and insights that they would never share with lesser communicators.  What I have seen time and time again is that central to that is not how or what you say or ask, but your intent.  Yes, regardless of how you pose a question, what will determine the response will be how the buyer sees your intent, if they see it as self-serving, they will limit their response.  If they see your intent as wanting to learn and understand where they are now, where they are trying to be, and what is preventing them from getting there, then they will open up and share.  The more they share the more insight you’ll gain, giving you the ability to ask more pointed questions, the more revealing and insightful the answers.

Again, good news, this can be learned, practiced and improved over time.  Start by forgetting the product and what you and your company “do”.  As I have mentioned here in the past, leave your product in the care, and “go in” and focus on facilitating and objective setting session.  Where are they now, where do they want to be, why that, what resources, what alternative path, what will that mean for the company and them as individuals, and more.  No product safety net, no pitch, just speaking for the sake of communicating.  Master that, and you’ll always be an A player.

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d-orsay-clock_3

The Power of Why > How – Part 20

Tibor Shanto – tibor.shanto@sellbetter.ca 

Monday I wrote about the power of the Why > How one-two punch.  Rather than doing the conventional probing around the decision process, who is involved, what are the steps, are there steps defined or is it ad-hock, etc.  Ask anyone if they are the ones to make the decision, and they’ll likely say yes, ask about Why and How the current vendor was selected, and you may find a different scenario, with additional and at times more important players that will have to be engaged to get the decision you want.  But that’s just the start, you can leverage Why > How, in a more granular way to give you further insights about the buyer, their organization, and how to adjust your execution to achieve success.

First is across time.  Look to the past, present and future.  Looking to the past will not only tell how they do things, people don’t change dramatically.  How they bought software last year or the year before, unless there is an entirely new crew, in which case exploring their past will still provide visibility to how they do things.  Assuming the players have not changed, exploring the past will give you a clear picture as to their propensity to change.  If they have continuously lagged the market in adopting new technologies, if they are still sitting back wait for cloud computing to be validated, you need to adjust your sales approach accordingly, at times even to the point of moving on and revisiting the opportunity in the future.  At the other end are innovators and early adopters, where they are on Moore’s curve will dictate how you execute and win them as a client.

Exploring the future, especially when that exploration is through the prism of their business will also dictate execution.  If they have clear objectives, aligned around elements of their business and how they look to grow it, it will make your sale easier, perhaps easier is the wrong word, more like ‘straight forward’.  Assuming their plans make sense you can focus on helping them achieve them.  If they have clear objectives but have chosen a less than optimal means of achieving them, then you need to first get them to consider alternatives.  Why > How, will help you to get them to change course, preaching is ineffective, but a series of “Why that?”, “How will that look?” questions will help you to get them to look at things differently, and from there to look at different things.

The other plain that Why > How will help is by exploring both the individual you are speaking to, and the Why’s > How’s of their organization.  This is especially important when there are multiple stakeholders or decision makers.  This helps in aligning personal agendas with corporate objectives, this can help you create alignment among the players by focusing on common elements, of each of the individuals, and those of the company.  Minimize differences, especially when not critical to the project, and build on overlap and common elements that you can enhance by virtue of you experience and past success.

I know there are some sales pundits out there who are afraid of the word Why, and would rather have you wait for a random event to trigger your success.  I say take control of your success by asking Why > How, early and often.

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