businessman with umbrella and thumb down rain

Rejection In Your Face4

By Tibor Shanto – tibor.shanto@sellbetter.ca 

In the late 1990’s or early part of the last decade, I remember reading a piece about a study in one of the Scandinavian countries, who were early adopters of text messaging, SMS. It pointed to the fact that more and more young people were choosing to initially interact with potential dates using SMS, one of the key reasons that rejection was easier to deal with when it was not direct, in your face. The rate of rejection or acceptance did not change much, may have even gone up as it is easier to ignore a text message. But the lack intimacy, direct contact, not having to be in direct contact at the time of rejection, made it more bearable, despite the result.

There is no doubt that the reason sales people do not like to prospect, specifically direct prospecting, for instance telephone prospecting, is rejection. Who can blame them, no one wants to be rejected, and it is only compounded when that rejection directly impacts one’s ability to earn a living, eat and generally succeed in their chosen vocation. This is why so many sales people and companies spend time and money trying to avoid objections. The thinking being, “if we can avoid rejection, we will have greater success.” Understandable but hardly practical, if you are going to make unsolicited calls (cold or pre-warmed), you will face rejection. If you are going to play football, you will get tackled, you will get bruised, and if you have any intention of succeeding, you will get back up and ready yourself for the next play. Not so for many in sales.

This became even more clear during an unsocial discussion with a proponent of social selling. He was trying to convince me that there is less rejection with his approach than with telephone prospecting. While neither of us had the stats to prove or dispute, what was clear is that his focus was not the rejection itself, but more how he did, or did not, have to deal with it. Much like the adolescent lovers in Scandinavia, for this person, and I suspect for many who exclude telephones from their prospecting routine, it was more about how direct the rejection was.

“I don’t mind if they don’t respond, I just don’t want to have to deal with the reality of it.”

Which is another example of where the driving factor in executing a sales is not the desired outcome, but how it “feels”. It feels good when someone puts a like on your LinkedIn or Facebook post, allowing us to pretend that those who choose not to like it, who ignore and reject the message, just don’t exist. But from a desired outcome perspective, no different. So why not go direct?

One of my first sales jobs required that I make 160 dials per day, speak to 30 people, and get a yes from ten. My manager helped me by highlighting that if the 100 people who “rejected” me through the week were all in the subway car with me on my ride home Friday, they would have no idea it was me who they blew off on the phone. To this day, I look at the people in the Starbucks line, and wonder which one blew me off on the phone that morning.

While rejection may not be fun, it is part of sales, and will happen no matter which approach you take, it just a question of how direct, and how you deal with it, choosing not to deal with it does not change things. The real question is what is more important, achieving desired outcomes, or???

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Hot and cold phones

What’s The Difference Between A Cold Call and Warm Call?2

By Tibor Shanto – tibor.shanto@sellbetter.ca 

The simple answer is that one is scheduled, and the other is not. Some may add that in a warm call the recipient may be aware of the person calling and the reason for the call, usually in the form of a referral. Some may add that one can “warm up” a call by doing research and having something relatable for the recipient, so they don’t blow you off as quick.

But the reality is that the difference is in your head.

Any unscheduled call, be it from a referral or from an overly informed rep, is an interruption. That’s why I tell people that I work with to reorient how they think about their work. If you are calling people who do not have a call scheduled in their calendar, you are interrupting them – next time someone asks you what you do for a living, I want you to say with great pride – “I am a professional interrupter; I interrupt people in the process of helping them achieve their objectives and delivering positive impact on their business.”

Download your copy of the Objection Handling Handbook

The challenge for most sales people, and the reason the call leaves them feeling cold, is that they are unprepared for the series of events and reactions their interruption sets into process.

After having research the company in an effort to warm the call, they figure that they have something relevant to say, and fail to take into account the interruption. So they wax poetic, all the while the prospect is thinking “how can I get back to work”. This is just compounded when they are usually talking about “solutions”. Given that 70% or more of the market is not looking for a solution, the interruption just seems worse when they deem the message to be irrelevant. Add to this that they have heard this same approach a thousand times before. So what can you do, focus on Objectives, not pains or needs; every business has objectives, align with those, and you’ll go from an irritating interruption, to an interruption with possibilities. Yet few research, they continue to research for problems some may have that fit their solution, rather than the other way around. You want the reaction to be “I was thinking about this”, not “WTF is this guy talking about”, leading to a click or objection.

When the objection comes, most sales people take the rejection personally. After all, they spent all this time researching the company, the person, and god knows what else, and at the moment of interruption, it seems all for not. As soon as it is personal, people get defensive, and it’s all downhill from there.

Managing and overcoming objections on a cold call starts long before they come up in the call. We interrupt, that triggers specific reaction. As before, if the initial narrative was a “solution” based intro, most reps defend and double down on that narrative, thus accelerating their fate. But if the intro was based on Objectives, doubling down on those allows you to expand your potential value rather than limit it.

If you can accept that you are an interruption, and focus on objectives and impacts, you will be in a position to manage and take away objections, and move towards a conversation – a sales conversation about their objectives, not pains, needs or solutions.

Download your copy of the Objection Handling Handbook

Hot and cold phones
Disapproval thumbs down by a male executive.

3 Reasons Your Voice Mails Fail0

By Tibor Shanto – tibor.shanto@sellbetter.ca 

Voice mail is not going away, mostly because people will have to answer their phones rather than being able to screen calls and preserve their time and sanity for things other than bad prospecting calls. Leaving you to make one of two choices:

  1. Not to telephone prospect, thereby avoiding the dreaded voicemail
  2. Learn how to leave proper voice mails and prosper from the dreaded voicemail

True to Pareto’s principle, the majority of sales people chose option one, and do not make calls; and based on stats, it seems do not make quota, am I the only one making the connection here? Here are three reasons your voice mails are failing, and how to change that and your prospecting results.

1. Intent

Every action you take in sales has to have a purpose, and intended outcome that moves the opportunity forward. Most have the wrong intent when it comes to voice mail, if they have an articulated intent at all.

There is one purpose for leaving a message, and that is to get a call back, that’s it, nothing else, one singular measure of success, a call back.

But if you listen to most messages, sales people reach for (and miss) much more. They overload the prospect with a bunch of unnecessary information, which lead to everything but the prospect wanting to call you back.

Your message should not be geared to getting an appointment or schedule a call, it should not be to introduce you, your company or product, certainly not to sell. Again, One Singular Purpose: get a call back!

2. TMI

Too much information, yes, building on the above, ask yourself why someone would call you back if your message contains everything they need to make a decision. Think about it, 99% of outbound voice mail greetings contain a request for “detailed information”, and why do they want that information? So they know why not to call you back. So as you’re waxing poetic about how you’re calling from a Fortune 500 company, a leader in the area of Blah Blah, they are looking around thinking they already have a Blah Blah, they are not currently looking for more or a new Blah Blah, so they 76 your message. Leaving you to believe that voice mail does not work, when in fact the problem is the message you leave, while your words say you want to speak, the underlying “message” communicates, don’t bother.

3. Be Counter Intuitive

The are uncomfortable when they lack enough information to make up their mind, which is why point 2 above is key, information works against us. The human mind hates a mystery, a situation where they may not feel completely compelled to call you back, but are also left with the feeling that if they don’t they may be missing out on something. In that scenario, some will ignore the message, but almost as many will act to solve the mystery. My goal in voice mail is to leave just enough of a message to create a curiosity, and the only way to satisfy that curiosity, is to pick up the phone and find out.

Focus your intent, provide only enough information to drive that intent, don’t worry about being different, and don’t pay attention to those who have not picked up a phone for years.

Want to learn how I get 50% of messages returned within 72 hours? Click here to learn the method in detail.

Night view of rail tracks in depot, Kiev

Changing Your Path To #Prospecting #Success2

By Tibor Shanto – tibor.shanto@sellbetter.ca 

No one says telephone prospecting is easy, which is why I am always puzzled as to why many sales people make it even more difficult than it already is. Many don’t set out to sabotage themselves, some are not even aware they are doing it, and many are just sadly following the advice of pundits who talk about but don’t actually telephone prospect. What many are doing is ignoring some basics communication realities that in a sales situation cannot and should not be ignored.

Over 90% of sales conversations are started or initiated by the seller, this goes to 100% of telephone prospecting calls, especially cold calls. So how we start the call will very much dictate the flow of the call, and even the reaction of the prospect. Start things the right way and you improve your odds, start the wrong way, and you dig a hole that will be hard to get out of. How you start a cold call matters, that’s why scripts are important.

While everyone agrees that the first few seconds of a call are crucial to the success of the call, most still chose to squander those precious seconds.

Most recipients of cold calls start down a path, in most cases that path is headed to them blowing us off and getting back to work. Our job is to either set them on a different path, or change the path they started down, if not, the conclusion is clear, no prospect, (they are back doing what they were before we interrupted), no opportunity, frustration, and time we will never recover, gone. This mainly happens because we play into the expectation of the prospects, instead of challenging those expectations.

Having listened to thousands of real world calls, most calls start by telling the prospect who is calling, and in its worst form this includes the callers title, and some self-serving statement about their employer: Hi, my name is George Handoff, I am the Mid-Atlantic Account Manager with ACME Corp. a Fortune 500 company and leading manufacturer of Sprocket Valves.” Who cares, what does that tell someone you have interrupted in the middle of their day? Do you really expect them to get excited about any of that? This is usually followed by highlighting the types of problems you have “solutions” for. No, that’s not the sound of them hanging up, it is their head hitting the disengage button as they fall asleep listening to all that, the ones that stay awake, just blow you off.

Given the fact that only about 3 of 10 people you call will recognize the problem, and only one of those three are willing to act now. The other seven could care less because they don’t see themselves in the picture, and your opening statement sets them down the path of “Who cares, I need to go back to work, good bye.”

To set them on a different path, why not start the call by highlighting what things look like after your product is in place. Lead with the outcomes! How many more units did you help someone produce in the same or less time; how did you improve their cash-flow; how much did you help increase market share, or how many of their target prospects did you help them land, how many more appointments did your prospects have as a result of your work, and what was the increase in pipeline value? Those are interesting opening that set the conversation on a path they not only can relate to, but want to achieve as well.

It’s not a big change, but one where you are presenting your capabilities via specific outcomes and impacts your clients had and were able to achieve as a result of your offering. That’s a path worth exploring, one they are thinking about, but no one is calling about, especially those waiting to be found.

The only reason many will tell you that cold calling sucks is because of the results they are getting. But rather than giving up on the cold call, they should give up on their approach, and try a path that has an ending of interest to prospects, be they Looking or Status Quo.

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a-different-fish

Pain Leads To No Gain In Prospecting!0

A few weeks ago, I posted a piece titled “No Pain – No Game?”, playing off the old weight exercise motto. In case you didn’t bother rushing to read the piece, it suggests that if you can only sell to buyers who have a self-declared pain or need, you will be in trouble, as 70% of the market, the Status Quo, is immune to the pain argument.

But there is a further reason why reliance on pain for sales success could in fact be painful (in the form of missing quota, not making enough commission to buy your girlfriend or kids the winter solstice gift they really want).

Many successful business people, especially small business owners and entrepreneurs have a different outlook than the average sales person or corporate employee. Because they are not cocooned in the comfort of corporate safety, with a few given responsibilities. They know it will not be easy, it will not be 9 to 5, it will not be a straight line to success, they don’t get a weekly paycheck or a Friday Beer Lunch while they are “waiting to make things work”, like many sales people who fail to deliver quota. They know to succeed they will need to face some challenges and adversities. They are the business living version of “No Pain – No Gain”.

a-different-fishSuccessful business people are more stoked by the possibilities long term success brings to let a few temporary, often expected setbacks occur. They have heard all the negatives, potential risks, financial ruins, and still decided to push ahead, commit money, time resources, and sweat to realizing their dream and vision. They have planned for roadblocks and detours, you pointing them out is just boring to them. Unless, you can show them how you will help them realize their vision for their business, for them as individuals, you will be chewed up and spit out, all in a very social way. Given their drive, do you really think a little pain is going to stop them? Or do you think they want someone who can help them work past the pain. The business athlete knows how to work through pain to get the results the average person does not. Even senior people within corporate settings have demonstrated characteristics that have allowed them to distinguish themselves from the also-rans.

The people heading up organizations, entrepreneurs and serial small business owners are not your usual breed, they have different filters, they work hard play hard, win hard, they’re not in business to socialize, they do that after they achieve their objectives. So, if you fail to take that difference into account, and fail to adjust for that, because you have been selling to middle management or users, and that will not work when you are dealing with someone who not only has the vision, but more importantly the balls to act, and do things that most others clearly have difficulty doing or lack the will and/or knowhow to do. The pain and headwind that may scare some, is an expectation for many of your buyers, focusing on pain, rather than objectives, and how you specifically can help them achieve them, will lead to more pain for you than these buyers are willing to deal with, because they know what is beyond that, and that’s what they want to talk about.

Serial entrepreneurs are serial sales winners, and winners know that there is an element of fact to “No Pain No Gain”, a smart seller focuses on the gain, not the pain. Click To Tweet

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pipeline-insurance

Pipeline Insurance2

By Tibor Shanto – tibor.shanto@sellbetter.ca 

Insurance is one of those things that everyone has but nobody really wants. In some ways, we feel that we are throwing money away, until that rainy day or unforeseen event arrives, and we are all too happy to have the insurance. As much as we hate the experience, we do it because we know that it’s the best way to ensure that we don’t have a sever disruption, financial or other, that will negatively impact our lives.

Rich people are always over insured, the rest of us have to be more selective, what do we need to ensure, and can we afford to leave “exposed”, risking come what may. When times get tough, cash-flow is squeezed, most people pull back on discretionary spending, then less discretionary spending. This includes things we consider “good to have”, but when the immediate expense is greater than the perceived risk, or having to go without, we cut back on those things. When you’re feeling good in your 40’s, but tight for cash, you may feel you have to make choices; you’ll likely forgo disability coverage in favour of car insurance, as you need to drive to work daily. As cash becomes tighter, you make more choices, not always in line with your long-term goals, but just enough to get you through the here and now.

It is a lot like prospecting, we all hate to do it, especially the traditional type, where we have to engage with prospects who are not lined up at our door, or downloading the latest ditties of wisdom your content teams pinches out. But oh we like prospect when we have them, there is nothing like a full pipeline brimming with opportunities. Assuming they are all real opportunities, some will close, some won’t, but one way or the other they all have to be replaced; and replaced by a multiple of your close ratio. Simply, if your conversion rate of opportunities that go into your pipeline is 4:1, every time you close one client, you will need to replace it with four prospects. The condition is that they have to be real, a lot of sales people keep opportunities in their pipeline even when the chance of the closing are low and declining, because the illusion of opportunities allows them to make choices, similar to insurance choices above. In this case, it is forging prospecting in a regular and disciplined way.

But as you work your magic, and close the deals in your pipeline, which I know takes time and effort, giving you plenty of reason to make choices about how you use your time. The consequences of not prospecting are off in the future, if you have a 3 month cycle, and you have “a lot” of opportunities, you’ll tell yourself that you can afford not to prospect. “Look at all the money in the pipeline, I need to focus on that, I can prospect next week, or when I close all this.” But by the time you do close them, it will be too late to replenish without a gap in income.

Time to get insurance to avoid this void, in the case of your pipeline, the best insurance you can get, is prospecting!

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very boring phone call

Or – You’re Just A Boring Prospector0

By Tibor Shanto – tibor.shanto@sellbetter.ca 
I get to listen to a lot of phone calls made by a whole lot of B2B sales people. Some are selling bleeding edge services to prospects with bleeding edge expectations, others are selling traditional products that are as exciting as watching paint dry, or listening to call recordings. There are always things we can change and improve from a skill and techniques standpoint, in fact, I consider a week less productive from a sales development success perspective when I have not learned some new thing to improve my prospecting.

But the one thing no one can teach you is a zest for what you are doing. A zeal for success, not just your own, but that of your prospect. Add to that all the silly and self-limiting things sales people do on the phone that throttle their message, especially when they want to come across cute, overly courteous (to the point where it extinguishes any chance you had to begin with), non-threatening, and all the self-imposed barriers to prospecting and sales success. But it is I the zest and zeal that are lacking in most calls, and the result is nothing short of boring. The main reason clients hang up is they don’t want to hit their head on the desk as they fall asleep listening to the drivel on the other end of the line.

Emotions are contagious, our state, our intent, our feelings are all contagious, and are all in play when making a prospecting call, much more so than in other forms of prospecting. Which why when done well, telephone prospecting is still the most effective means of engaging with a prospect other than a direct introduction. The ones who tell you telephone prospecting is not effective (for them), are the ones who can’t do it. The ones whose emotions and mixed bag of feelings, and by extension everything they are projecting on the phone cause them to fail, and draw the second most obvious conclusion, “hey this is not working for me”. The most obvious one being, they don’t know what they are doing and stinging out the house.

It’s not all bad or sad, there are things you can fix, practice and change. You can think about leading with some solid and relevant outcomes for prospects based on past experience. You can teach sales people to focus on clients’ objectives, not features, and what our company does. It does not take much to help sellers to understand that it is all about the end, not the means, which erroneously most sales people lead with on the phone.

The one thing that sellers have to change on their own is to stop sound boring (in fact stop being boring). All the steps many take to make themselves more appealing, less threatening, plainly said, more beige, just makes them boring as, well you know what. You have to pity the poor bastard who answers the phone, only to be greeted by series of inconsequential words that sound the same as the last 5,000 or so call, I mean is there a faster cure to insomnia and no-sale?

So next time, ask yourself and be honest, is it the telephone that does not work for prospecting, or are you just boring on the phone? Click To Tweet

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Portrait angry young woman screaming on mobile phone

Phone Prospecting – Cool and Not Cool3

By Tibor Shanto – tibor.shanto@sellbetter.ca 

People talk about prospecting as though it is open to interpretation, it should not be.  Prospecting is the act of engaging with someone with the purpose of initiating a sales cycle.  It is not about trying to sell, qualify, or any of the things that will never happen if you do not engage.  There is a singular purpose to prospecting, that is to engage.

It is not about striking a relationship that you hope will lead to something, that’s called dating; anyway, who says they can’t buy from you before you form a real relationship; who says there needs to be a whole lotta clicking, liking, and retweeting before you can engage?  The only ones who say things like that are people who do not prospect.  People who confuse prospecting with a social encounter, those who still believe the world will beat a path to their door if they built a better ____________ (insert product).

This post is more for those who have to prospect beyond the known, with people they have never met, not connected with on LinkedIn, or any previous contact.  Connecting and engaging with these prospects is a different effort and experience, and calls for some more effort than clicking around, steps like cold calling.

 

This requires a different approach with a different mindset and outlook.   I was describing one of these actions to rep recently, and he said “that’s not cool”.  You know what’s really not cool, is not having enough opportunities in your pipeline and not knowing what to do about it.  So here some cool and not so cool things when it comes to successful prospecting.

Cool: Leaving a voice mail.  Not only is it cool cause people call back, and you don’t get calluses on fingers dialing them over and over again, but even when they don’t call back it is a touch point, and you’re going to need 8 to 12 touch points before a potential prospect will respond.   You can get some insights about how I get 40 – 50 percent of messages I leave, returned within 72 or so hours, by click here.

Not cool: Wasting valuable time at the top of a prospecting call with your title, region, and other useless info that either puts the prospect to sleep or causes them to hang up.  Tell them what’s in it for them, not about you.  Worse and funnier, is when I call a number and the outbound voice mail message is:

“Hi you’ve reach Alfred Newman, regional mid-west sales manager, with ACME Corp, a Fortune 500 company.”  (Sometimes they even add their company’s tag line).  WHO CARES!  Sure, Mom and your significant other, but no one else.

Instead of boring them to tears with that drivel, why not leave the toll free number for your support team, the people they probably want to talk to anyway.

Not cool: One outbound voice mail crime, when I call someone on Friday October 7, and their message says “Hi, this Emma, I am currently out of the office on vacation returning on Monday June 27.”  What’s a prospect going to think when they return your message and it is October?

Cool: Leading the call with outcomes you have delivered against objectives similar to theirs, so they know what’s in it for them, rather than knowing your title (or corporate rank).

Not Cool:  When a prospect says they are not interested, asking “What are you not interested in?”  When a prospect says they are all set, responding “Well maybe I can send you some information so you know about us in case something comes up”.  I can’t believe people get paid to say that, I think they are paid to move past that and get the appointment.

Cool:  Calling everyone who is part of the decision, one after the other, and bringing them together rather than one by one.  Not only does that take more time and work, but will force you to cover the same ground over and over, whereas, if you reached out and got everyone involved at the same time, you can create the opposite effect.

Not Cool:  Asking “Can I speak to the person in charge of…”  Nothing says it’s time to put on a rain coat because we are about to experience some spray and pray.

Cool: Focusing on objectives not pain.  They all have objectives, very few will admit to pain, whether it is there or not.

Certainly not an exhaustive list, just things I experienced this week.  So these were some the things I observed, tell us what you think is cool or uncool in prospecting, drop your thoughts in the comment box below.

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pearl

Prospecting For Pearls2

By Tibor Shanto – tibor.shanto@sellbetter.ca 

Regardless of what some might tell you, there are elements of sales that are quite organic, and as a result there are lessons we can take from nature. One is that not all things that lead to real value start smoothly or simply, but as the process unfolds, the end result can be both a thing of beauty and value. That’s one way I like to look at prospecting, specifically telephone prospecting, yes cold calling.

I like to think of a cold call, the very start of an engagement with a prospect, as being very much like the start of the process in the making of a pearl. There is no denying that the pearl starts out as an irritant, an intrusion from the outside; but then over time, ongoing interaction, things develop, and where the end result is a thing of beauty and value.

Let’s be straight, I am not suggesting that you set out to irritate anyone intentionally, but at times you may not have a choice if you are going to help and win new customers. This is especially so with prospect who are removed from the market, the Status Quo, who left to their own, are not actively engaged in or thinking about buying anything, beyond “social” reach; this is usually in excess of 70% of you target market. These prospects, who are not self-declared buyers, may perceive the initial approach as a nuisance or aggravation.

I get it, cold calls are irritating, even cold calls that executed well; but I would also argue, not for the reason most think and fear. Sure bad calls are bad no matter what, but when done right, the reality is that we are making the prospect face things they have been able to ignore and burry, and avoid dealing with. They know what they have is not just far from not perfect, but not even close to ideal. It is just that they have decided that “the pain of the same is less that the pain of the change”. Initiating that change, the catalyst that leads to action, not just denying or ignoring the issue, may not be pleasant to start.

Those who a) understand that, and b) understand how they will manage the buyer experience, have the greatest success in telephone prospecting. To be successful at cold calls you need to be able to talk to outcomes and changes that will benefit the buyer and deliver the business impacts they are looking to achieve. This starts with understanding what outcomes you have been able to others in similar roles, in similar type of environments.

If you call a small fleet operator and initiate the call peaking about pains and needs they have not acknowledged, your fate is sealed before the first ring. Yet this is what most sales people and pundits go for: pains, needs, problems, (solutions), efficiencies, and all the things that prospects have turned a deaf ear to for years. Instead, you can call and speak to how you can help them get more service calls in a given day, or how you can help them extend the life of their vehicles, and improve their return on assets, or how you can help them reduce fuel costs while allowing them to wear a “green” halo. These are things not tied to pain, but to outcomes, things people are always thinking about, and more willing to hear more about.

The best sellers understand that part of their job description is “disruptive marketing”, which includes the willingness and ability to take an interruption to a conversation, an irritating grain of sand to a pearl.

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iStock_000004159256XSmall

3 Things To Not Say In Prospecting Calls0

By Tibor Shanto – tibor.shanto@sellbetter.ca 

Many sellers ask me what they should add to or say in an initial telephone prospecting call.  Having listened to and analyzed thousands of calls, I have come to the conclusion that most sales would make great strides if they first focused on what to leave out of their calls.  There are things that people say in the call that make sense based in “normal” situations, but prospecting, cold calling people who you have never spoken to, who are not expecting your call, not looking for your product, and were busy doing something they thought was important at the time you called.

As discussed in the past, your prospect has heard it all before, if they get five calls a day, that’s 25 a week, 1,200 a year, some 6,000 calls over the last five years, so you have to break through the apathy and “deafness” if you are to have any chance at all.  This means not just being different from the others, but sounding different than all the other callers they’ll encounter this week.

To help you avoid sounding like the also rans who did not get the deal, here are three things to leave out of your initial prospecting call; BTW, I have heard all of these in the last week, by people who most would consider to be “good” sales people.  Here we go:

  1. How are you? – I know it sounds simple, polite, and innocent, but it adds little if anything to the call, and opens some risk. I have a very binary view of initial calls, if something does not add measurable upside to the call does not belong in the call, “how are you?” is definitely one.  It is one the things that we hate about the calls we get in the middle of dinner, where a strange voice asks how you are as though they were your best friends concerned about your day.  Skip it, respect their time and intelligence, instead of asking how they are, get to why you are calling.
  1. Is this a good time? – No! As I have spoken about on this blog in the past, our job is that of “professional disruptors”, professional interrupters.  By definition, a cold call is when we call someone who does not know us, is not expecting our call, but fits the profile of someone who would benefit from out offering.  With all that, no it is not a good time, but I really don’t care, because I have something important for the prospect, something that will help them achieve their objectives and improve their business.
  1. Who is in Charge Of? – I know, but this still goes on. Wanna tell a prospect you don’t care, you can’t be bothered, or that you really don’t enjoy your job, just start the call like that.  I swear if I had a dollar for every time I hear that each week, I could subsidize my coffee habit.  It is no longer impossible to find anyone, and if all else fails, ask for a specific title, “May I speak to the VP of Operations”.  Or pick an afternoon and call in advance to collect names to be ready when you make the money call.

Now I know some will sit there and say “I know this, this is too basic”, and you would be right, which is what makes these kind of calls so wrong.

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