Lipstick. Great Variety of Women's Lips. Set of Mouths

Difference Is In the Eyes Of The Prospect8

By Tibor Shanto – tibor.shanto@sellbetter.ca

There is a lot of talk about differentiation in sales, whether that is at the product level, sales technique level or other factors. Some difference is good, some goes a bit far, unfortunately most of seems to fall short. The main reason is that most vendors and sellers spend time and effort to differentiate themselves from other products, companies, or sales people. As with other miscues in sales, the problem is that most of the effort excludes the only element that counts, the buyer.

Buying and selling are very subjective experiences. While there are reams of tools and means for capturing requirements, allowing buyers to better understand what will help them achieve their objectives, presenting a clear and objective process, there is a range of undercurrents that allows a lot of subjectivity to creep in to the decision. Who among us has not lost a deal where the we were a perfect fit based on requirements. Or conversely won a deal, where on the face of things we were deficient and less cost effective than an alternative. The reason is simple and human, people are very subjective, (and buyers are people), and as such will make decisions using more than just logic, leading to the reality that difference, like beauty, is in the eyes of the beholder.

While many may not like it, but one advantage to having multiple decision makers or stakeholders in the deal, is that it can naturalize subjectivity, allowing us to better present and leverage real differences we may have. I say we may have, because most leading products have very few real differences, especially in the eyes of buyers. What some vendors think is really different, may not be that important to the market, which is likely why the others have avoided it. With “sameness” rampant in products, the other difference is how you sell, and by extension your sales process. The challenge here is that most people sell in a very similar way, leading to only superficial differences that even the least experienced buyer can see through.

Once you accept that difference is in the eye of the prospect, and not something you can ram down their throat or post on a billboard, you can then switch your approach to understanding how they see themselves and their reality as being different than others they are looking at. Let’s be clear, it may not always be true that what the buyers are looking for is all that different than their neighbor’s, but, we are dealing with buyer perception, not necessarily reality as we see it.

The only option is to have the prospect articulate what they see as being different. And while most sellers will tell you that they are doing that, when observed in action, they are still very much anchored to their product, and features they feel are “solutions” for the buyer’s “pain”. Presentations are geared to highlighting the “vendor’s difference”, rather than the difference the buyer is trying to achieve in their business. Presentations limit our ability to get the prospect to help us differentiate ourselves, mostly because they are centered around the product, and things we believe we are “solving”, that in turn make us different.

Especially early in a cycle, leave you your product, presentations, preconceptions in the car; go in armed only with questions that will help you uncover the buyer’s objectives, and impacts they are looking to deliver to their business. This sounds easy, and is often met by “we’re already doing that”, until we examine the questions many sellers ask, and the reality of some first and early meetings. Remember that the “difference” starts long before you engage, so how you engage, and what happens at your first encounter is key. You may think your PowerPoint is different, but it is still PowerPoint.

If you stay focused on the impacts and outcomes, you will start to establish a difference. When you get the prospect to share their objective, avoid the instinct to map those back to your product. First, drill down on those objectives, why those, how will that change their business, what are related risks, and more. This will allow you to demonstrate your Subject Matter Expertise, and help the prospect validate their direction and means of getting there. If that direction and means are less than optimal, help the buyer reorient their thinking, reorient their direction and path. Now that’s different, especially in a world where sellers are not experts, and seek the safety of “the customer is always right” over pushing back, getting the buyer to see things differently, help them down an alternate path to alternate results. (Easy Kellyanne, it’s just sales). When prospects start their journey, they are more focused on the end than the means, which is why your product, solution, or whatever, is not that important in the early stage.

With difference being in the eye of the prospect, the more we take ourselves and our product out of the early phases of the sales, the more different a prospect will see us; the more we can make them think instead of listen, the greater the difference in experience, leading to different experience and results for both the buyer and the seller.

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Boy scratching his head, confused by what is happening

Is That All The Difference You Got?0

By Tibor Shanto – tibor.shanto@sellbetter.ca 

Here is an example of an element discussed in Monday’s post.  It’s hard to see the difference when you all look the same. Time for Sales and Marketing to step up and say something that makes a difference for the buyer.

Ever wonder why buyers would rather go it on their own?  I did when I was watching my favourite Sunday morning political pundit parade, these commercials were one spot apart in the same break.

If this is the best Marketing and Sales can come up with in speaking to their potential customers, no wonder it is coming down to price, there is little other difference between the two.

No wait, did the one guy shave his beard for the second one?  Is it surprise buyers are confused and would rather do it on their own, and companies need apps to do their selling for them?

Back to the drawing board.

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Voicemail word cloud

Voice Mail As A Differentiator1

By Tibor Shanto – tibor.shanto@sellbetter.ca 

If you’re in sales, you know that a crowd favourite is differentiation. Companies, marketing folks, sales people all want to differentiate, which is not an easy thing in a climate where differences are few and subtle. Often the only real difference is the sale itself, since products tend to be often all but identical. The “sale” has two main components that allow for differentiation, the individual involved, and how they execute.

The first is important, but not as much as people make it out to be, you’d have to really go out of your way to play-off someone to the point where they won’t buy your product. As rare as that may (should) be, when it does happen, the buyer can usually procure the product through other means, depriving the “bad seller” of both the satisfaction and the commission. This leaves execution as the key differentiator.

Yet most sales people seem to almost go out of their way not to be different, either in the way they do things or don’t do things. They spend time and effort to meet a social norm and construct not of their own making or choosing, all in an effort to fit in and not be different from the herd perusing the same prospect. I have written in the past about sales people constantly telling me “oh, I couldn’t do that.” Or the more inclusive “you can’t do that.” When I point out that have checked with the federal, provincial/state authorities, and municipal lawmakers, and there is no law preventing them from in fact carrying out the act in question, they still tell me they can’t do it, and why, it is different. Isn’t that what you want to be when the person you’re calling has heard it 6,000 time before.

Rather than taking the opportunity to be a breath of fresh air, they labour at being “more of the same”, but a little shinier. Jumping on every bandwagon riding through town all in an effort not to be different.

Take voice mail as an example. One of the reasons many will give for avoiding telephone prospecting is the pervasiveness of voice mail. I could see this being an issue in 1987, but not since. The logical thing would be to develop a method for getting targets to call you back, not to avoid something because it is there. Add caller ID to the mix and it is clear that you need to do something different than your competitors, and different than what the target is expecting from a sales person.

For years I have been sharing a method for leaving voice mails that get returned, I generally average 40% – 50% of messages I leave being returned within 72 hours. Just this past Tuesday I left five messages, got responses by end of the day, and one appointment, and a follow up call in April; I hear sales is not a numbers game, but even then, that’s good no? Those who try it, execute it the way it is presented regularly improve their return call ratio, and increase appointments and pipeline.

The problem is that the methods I use is different, not comfortable, at first, then when you get sales it all changes. The great thing is that when prospects call back, I have already differentiated, and can continue to be different, and deliver an experience for the buyer that is different, and better than what they have been conditioned to expect from those who talk, but don’t act differentiation. The method has been challenged, ridiculed, mocked and dismissed by a whole bunch of people who have not tried the method, a behaviour not that different than the rest of the 80% they are claiming to be differentiated from. It is always the same, a few years ago someone wanting to feel good about their insecurity shared my method in a LinkedIn group, there was a rush of condemnation. But then a few days later, a bunch of people who tried it in the real world, chime in about the success they had connecting with people they have been trying to reach for some time. Being different takes work, and requires you to step away from the comfort of the crowd.

Click here to learn more about the different but effective voice mail technique, and start differentiating.

Tips to Use Your Business Differentiators to Increase Your Sales3

April 15

The Pipeline Guest Post – Megan Totka

One great way to make your business rise to the top is to focus on what makes it different from the competition. What you do with that realization can make your business. Get more out of your selling time and learn why your business is different from the competition — and why your differentiators matter to your customers.

There isn’t a single business out there that can thrive by selling products at a reasonable price exclusively. Here are five tips for integrating your differentiators into your everyday sales.

1. Understand your business differentiators and how they benefit customers.
Even if you’re selling a service or product in a competitive space, there is always something that makes your business stand apart from others.

Think about the anti-aging market. How does a company make its skincare line stand apart from the other ones out there? While price is important, hone in on what else there is to offer customers. How can you help them? What can your products do that other skincare products can’t?

As a business owner, you need to focus on your value-added difference and that will help distinguish your business from all of the others like it. It’s also vital to know and communicate to your customers what makes your business one of a kind. Make sure you can explain to your customers what impact your differentiators have on them. Focus and advocate for those differentiators – this is one of many ways to attract more new business.

2. Understand your competition and how to sell against them.
To help refine your own differentiators, it is helpful to grasp what your competitor’s differentiators are too. Get to know their strengths and their weakness. It’s important to understand the ladder – it can help you can step up your game in those areas. If you do lose a sale to the competition, go ahead and be brave: ask why that prospect chose to do business with them instead of you.

3. Always have integrity.
In a recent study by The Institute of Business Ethics, it was found that companies displaying a commitment to ethical conduct outperform companies that do not display ethical conduct. No one trusts or wants to do business with a salesperson that is dishonest and stomps all over competitors in an over-the-top sales pitch. Stay true to your business core values – and to yourself. Avoid highlighting the competition’s negatives – just be better about explaining your positives. Selling isn’t an effortless business, but a salesperson with integrity – someone who does the right thing at all times – is a massive differentiator and goes a long way to creating a compelling experience for their customers. Building a reputation of integrity takes years – but it only takes a few seconds to lose.

4. Integrate your differentiators into your marketing messages.
As you develop a marketing platform, make sure your differentiators play a big role in it. Your sales and marketing operations should be ingrained and clear so your customers can plainly see why you are the business he or she should chose to support.

5. Ask — and listen to — your customers’ wants and needs.
Your customers are the ones who can really help you figure out how to succeed in the business world. What matters to them? For a moment, step outside of your business box and look at it from a customer’s point of view. This can help you change your sales pitch and marketing message to focus on what exactly will help you seal the sales deal.
There are a lot of great businesses that offer good products and services. In order to make your business stand apart from all of the others out there, always remember to operate with integrity. Take the time to understand your differentiators and keep those at the forefront of your mind. Always listen to your customers and focus on what they want and need, not what you want to sell them.

How do you convey your differentiators to your customers? Has it helped you find success?

About Megan Totka

Megan Totka is the Chief Editor for ChamberofCommerce.com. ChamberofCommerce.com helps small businesses grow their business on the web and facilitates connectivity between local businesses and more than 7,000 Chambers of Commerce worldwide. She specializes on the topic of small business tips and resources and business news. Megan has several years of experience on the topics of small business marketing, copywriting, SEO, online conversions and social media. Megan spends much of her time establishing new relationships for ChamberofCommerce.com, publishing weekly newsletters educating small business on the importance of web presence, and contributing to a number of publications on the web. Megan can be reached at megan@chamberofcommerce.com.

Website: www.chamberofcommerce.com

Photo via flickr.com

 

3 Reasons To Stand Up To Sell Better – Sales eXecution 2832

By Tibor Shanto – tibor.shanto@sellbetter.ca 

Standing

Not only is standing up healthy, especially for a profession that spends a lot of time on its ass, but there are some specific ways why selling on your feet will help you sell better.

  1. While Prospecting – Most people will prospect sitting behind a desk, some although less and less, will have the phone in one hand, and a pen in the other, or one hand on the keyboard. Leaving them in an awkward position and unnatural position. Better to get a headset, ditch the chair and stand up, walk around, use your hands, and speak as though the person was in the room with you. You can get animated, step into key statements and sound like you are having a conversation, not pitching. If you need to take notes, elevate your notebook (paper or computer). Moving around with help you listen, think and respond better.
  2. When Presenting – Whether you are presenting to an individual or a group, stand up. Most sellers naturally sit down and conduct presentations that way, but it is better to stand, even when presenting to just one person. It gives you an air of authority, expertise, and leadership. Just the simple act of having them look up at you helps reinforce your expertise, and gives greater impact to what you are saying. This important not only when you presenting early in the cycle, but when you are presenting a proposal. As you move around, you become the focus, as you respond to questions you continue to demand attention. You can approach each person as they speak or you want to make a point, you can make a large room an intimate sale.
  3. When You Have To Think – We have all heard the expression “thinking on your feet”, well it is more than a figure of speech. I remember working for an executive who had a smart habit, she looked after her own health and that of the business in an interesting way. Whenever you scheduled an appointment with her, wanting to discuss something, she would take you for a walk, a brisk walk, she could move, outside. Her thinking was that it would limit the junk one would bring, not wanting to schlep stuff around while trying to keep up. You had to come prepared to not only speak what’s on your mind, but also to answer any questions she may have, and with no supporting documentation, or laptop, you had to know your stuff. On the other hand if you did, you would be free of all the paraphernalia, and as with the above two, free to think on your feet and have a great one-on-one with your boss.

Not only is standing and walking better for your health, it is better for selling and winning. Try it out, and when you are truly a convert, and the whether permits, take your new prospect for a walk, on your very first meeting, demonstrate your expertise and value, and get him/her out of the office and usually distractions that come with it.

Tibor Shanto

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Teach Them How To Answer0

By Tibor Shanto – tibor.shanto@sellbetter.ca 

Q+A

Whenever sales types get together to talk about how to improve their selling, high on the list is the importance of asking questions, good questions, and for good reason.

Good questions, not “what keeps you awake at night?” (The neighbor’s dog), not only uncover valuable data and information, but give you control of the flow and direction of the conversation. Setting the flow is one of the four pillars of effective sales communication, and one that many sales people don’t take full advantage of, or too easily abdicated to sellers in the hope of being “accepted” and not to come across “pushy” or “salesy”; such softy nonsense.

As importantly, good questions get the prospect thinking, an important ingredient in getting Status Quo customers to begin sharing their objectives and going beyond their comforts and preconceptions. It is when you can get them to think outside their self-imposed limits, and they begin to think things through and often out loud, that you can understand why they are stuck on the current state, and what you need to do to move them into unchartered territory for them, to the future state. This is why having questions about objectives are much more powerful than questions about needs or pain, it opens things up, goes to possibilities, not just cures.

But to fully maximize the impact of your questions, you also need to learn how to answer question the prospect will have. The better you get at asking questions that get the prospect to think, the more likely that they will ask you questions, sincere questions about the possibilities, not product related, and you need to be ready. This is more than just good listening, it is about continuing to drive the conversation in the way you answer these questions.

Your answers are another means of reinforcing the direction of the discussion. Especially in the early stages of the sale, your answers should open issues up further. All too often sellers, even experienced “solutions” sellers, see answering prospects questions as a means of “nailing things down”, but they don’t need to be. There is no rule that says questions explore while answers resolve. Answering a question in a way that causes the prospect to go deeper is one of the best ways to focus the discussion and drive the sale.

It is a great way to introduce you subject matter expertise, talk about how you have been able to drive specific outcomes and impacts without sounding like a pitch. By including examples and testimonial type of anecdotes in your answer, you can accelerate the discussion and engage the buyer much more effectively than always leaning and leading with questions. Not to mention how it helps build confidence in the buyer.

As with any skill, some will find and develop it on their own, but many, need to be taught and helped, but once they learn the process, it becomes part of their tool kit for ever. Combine this skill with information you’ll learn from you deal reviews, and you can have a much more effective, enticing for the buyer, and profitable for all, conversation.

Tibor Shanto

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Ego And Confidence In Sales Success – Sales eXecution 2782

By Tibor Shanto – tibor.shanto@sellbetter.ca 

Clone not

Successful sales people share certain attributes, some can be learned and developed, some we come by naturally, and if we have less of those than other, we can spend time and effort developing them, and improving our sales habits and results in the process. Two that are common to many successful sales people are ego and confidence. The question and challenge is proportions and dominance, and as always, intent.

Some sales people tend to confuse ego with confidence, and fall victim to this trait. When I was a young rep I had the fortune to learn the difference between the two, and learned to balance one with the other. My mentor kept telling me that if I have to tell people how great I am, rather than demonstrating it through my actions, ability and knowledge, I was letting my ego lead, and likely costing myself sales and friends. Demonstrating capabilities is confidence, a sign of security, attracting people and their confidence in me, and helping my sales success. Telling it to people signaled insecurity, thus causing them to pause before acting with me, and buying form me. Confidence is something you can build and more importantly share with others, bringing them into you process. An ego driven by insecurity is often sustained by having an air of superiority, expressed or implied, or both. Neither adding to ones sales success.

Let’s be clear there is nothing wrong with sales people having an ego, the question again is intent, and the risk of an unchecked ego. I remember once telling a director that I could not imagine or fathom going to our annual sales meeting and going up on stage to receive an award other than the one for making quota. This drove my activities, and gave her a great tool to motivate me when needed. I remember having a slow start to a fourth quarter, all she had to do was to remind me that I need X dollars to put me into the Platinum Club. No doubt it helped her bonus, but it was the reminder, the nudge I needed to get my act in gear; ego served a good purpose.

If confidence is a sign of ability and security, no doubt that is more than partly supported by knowledge and how to best apply that knowledge. In the case of sales how do we help buyers achieve their objectives, so they buy our product, pay their invoices and help us achieve Platinum or some such club. Some sale people are too lazy to acquire knowledge, after all it does take work, it often takes more than what your company will spoon feed you. Face with the choice of putting in the effort or faking it, many sales people opt for the latter. This is often manifested in some sales people compensating for knowledge with ego, or more accurately their lack of knowledge. As Einstein pointed out, the relationship is invers, Ego = 1/ Knowledge. By extension, the more knowledge the greater the confidence and less leading with ego. Buyers aren’t stupid, they can tell the difference, and their buying decisions reflect that. Leading to bruised egos and missed sales and numbers.

In the end the elements that make for a confident rep are usually the ones that make for a successful rep. When you find the balance tipping to ego, step back and ask what you need to do to re-calibrate, not only will it make you a better person, but a more successful seller.

What’s in Your Pipeline?
Tibor Shanto 

Social Style Cold Calling – Sales eXecution 2630

By Tibor Shanto – tibor.shanto@sellbetter.ca 

social billboard

As we have all noticed more and more companies are putting the Twitter and Facebook icons/logos not only on their marketing materials, but on trucks, and the signs on their buildings. In some instances they include their twitter handles, other cases not. I know I put my handle out there to help follow me, view my content, get a chance to see what I am about, and in general to invite them and encourage them to interact with me and my work. While some have called me odd, I figure that others have similar motives for displaying their “social signs”.

But I see it as sort of a half effort if you just display the Twitter logo on your truck or sign in front of your building, without including your handle. Puts the onus on me to go and search it, make sure that it is the right one, in most cases more bother than worth. Unless it involves a company you want to approach in order to do business with them, basically someone you want to prospect.

Which brings us to a company I have had my eye on for a bit, building my approach, but have yet to formally “put into play”. Last week when I drove by I noticed their new (or perhaps just newly cleaned) sign on the corner their building occupied. As you have guessed, the sign had the Twitter icon, but no handle. Hmm, I thought, let’s try something different.

I walked into reception, and said that I had noticed their sign, and wanted to talk to someone about their participation with and on Twitter. The receptionist looked puzzled, ask what specifically I wanted, I said I was interested in the company, and saw the icon on the sign, and wanted to follow them to satisfy my interest; so I was looking for their handle, but more importantly to speak with the individual who was managing their social media, gave her my card, which has my social coordinates on it. She picked up the phone, and a few minutes later, out cam a young lady, introduced herself as the person in marketing responsible for social media.

We talked for a few minutes, she told me why the company had decided to become active, how she got the job, and some of her objectives. One of which was t better interact with their clients and prospects, ensure their message was not only getting out, but received and understood by the right people. I asked if that included their sales team, and how the sales team was leveraging her work and social media in general. She smiled and said I would have to ask the VP of sales about that. Bingo!

He wasn’t in, but she introduced us via e-mail, and I booked the appointment.

You gotta love cold calling in the social age, it’s so not different than ever before.

What’s in Your Pipeline?
Tibor Shanto 

Inbound, Outbound and now Nowhere Bound – Sales eXecution 2411

By Tibor Shanto – tibor.shanto@sellbetter.ca

OOOPs

I have recently become a victim of some bad, no absolutely terrible, attempts at prospecting by people who bring little to their chosen profession, sales. But while it may be easy to blame the reps alone, their companies need to share in the blame and shame. Last week I was so pissed, I had to pick up the phone and call the rep and the company directly. Not surprisingly they did not understand what I saw them doing wrong.

To begin with, I or anyone in my company, has no absolute need for their “solution”. Yet another example of “solution selling” gone bad, unleashing a rep who runs around the country side looking for a problem. So why they would have wasted time and energy pursuing me is beyond me, but they did, and here is how it unfolded.

Last month I got an e-mail, presented in “very familiar” way, and it started this way:

Tibor,
Happy New Year!
I wanted to follow up to determine an appropriate time to….

I speak to a lot of people, did not recognize the name of the rep or the company, maybe this was due to the excesses of the holidays. So I did a quick search through my e-mails, sales software, LinkedIn, but nothing. I looked at the company page, not anyone I had prospected, nor were they at the top of my hit parade. Not wanting to be rude, or miss an opportunity, I sent them a note, asking what it was he was looking to “follow up to?” as I had no recollection of prior contact. No response, not a peep, and I promptly forgot about him, his note and his company.

Four weeks less a day later, another note:

Hi Tibor,

As a follow up to our last touch point, I wanted to see if now is perhaps a better time to briefly discuss….

He’s got balls, I’ll give him that, not much integrity or ethics, and I say this as someone who has proclaimed to know where the line is, happy to step close to it, but never cross it. He clearly had no issues in crossing it.

I called him up, introduced myself, not saying what I do for a living, just enquiring what we were following up to, as per my earlier note. He told me that they do it all the time, and he further defended it by saying that this is done all the time. I suppose that’s true, and everyday people get swindled in a number of ways, does that mean you have to do that too.

I am sure this kind of net cast every day, and I am sure the catch is healthy, otherwise they would make the effort to sell ethically. But I have to believe that if they did put the effort in, and assuming that their product has some merit, they would do much better than misleading potential prospects, and relying on those with bad memories. And while the debate over the pros/cons and merits of inbound vs. outbound will continue, and will the results of both, I hope we can all agree that this type of prospecting is truly nowhere bound.

What’s in Your Pipeline?
Tibor Shanto  

Why “Value Propositions” Are Useless12

By Tibor Shanto – tibor.shanto@sellbetter.ca

Lipstick Pig

It’s 2014, by now I assume you are no longer relying on Palm Pilot, going to Blockbuster for your in-home movie entertainment, so why are you still relying “value propositions” in the hope of engaging with potential buyers and winning clients?

People love the term value proposition, so user friendly, none threatening, cute, warm, and safe. Some pundits going to great lengths to elevate it above other questionable and formerly popular predecessors such as “the elevator pitch”, a concept dating back to liftmen trying to improve their lot with an unsuspecting captive (trapped) audience. I guess at one point someone alerted sellers to the fact that the word ‘Pitch’ was not conducive to consultative selling. So things evolved to USP – Or “Unique Selling Proposition”, exalting the uniqueness of one’s offering. But uniqueness on a product level is rare, continuous uniqueness even more infrequent. In the end it is still about what is being sold, and as such, just an elevated pitch.

And so it evolved, buyers are obviously looking for ‘Value’, (no matter how it is defined, or more often, undefined), while allowing sellers to cling to a familiar concept, ‘Proposition’, thus giving us the ever popular: ‘Value Proposition”.

Proposition –
1. the act of offering or suggesting something to be considered, accepted, adopted, or done.
2. a plan or scheme proposed.
3. an offer of terms for a transaction, as in business.

While this may have played well in focus groups, the reality is that you can put lipstick on it, but it’s still a ‘Pitch’. As with many things in sales, the problem is less with the concept than the execution.

The challenge is that sellers are still going into to selling situations with pre-molded ideas of value for a generic group of people, and proposing that it will fir to a specific scenario. Even well-crafted value propositions, with good contribution from Marketing, are rooted in “here is why this is good for you”, and are then proposed – pitched to potential buyers. While many of the assumptions that go into the value prop are indeed accurate, they are often “proposed” in a very one directional fashion, much like a pitch.

The better alternative would be to use the key elements of the value proposition as a basis for discussion. Rather that a proposing value, it is much more effective to mutually define and develop value for the potential buyer. You can still leverage the same facts and factors, but it is more about the way you use them to initiate and craft a discussion that will not only allow you to gain a better understanding of the buyer, their requirements and objectives, but will engage the buyer in a much deeper and impactful way. This will allow you to arrive at a mutually agreed on points of value that the buyer can take on without feeling that it was thrust on them in a pre-fab fashion.

The only practical use for “value propositions” is to disqualify buyers who don’t fit your preconceived cookie-cutter notion of who your right buyer is. Change proposition to definition, and you will eliminate those buyer that won’t benefit from your offering, while allowing you to engage and capture a much broader range of buyers that those who fit the mold.

What’s in Your Pipeline?
Tibor Shanto

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