3 Reasons Why Objections are Not a Bad Thing3

By Tibor Shanto - tibor.shanto@sellbetter.ca

No sales keys

Most sales people think about objections as being a bad thing, a lot of sales people and worse leaders, get really uptight when it comes to objections. Often before we have even began to define parameters with stakeholders, they’ll say “Oh, and we need an Objection Handling session”, they want to take a tennis approach to managing objections, prospect “throws” out an objection, and they want to hit it back to them. But objections are really not a bad thing, not always convenient or easy to manage, but they are not a bad thing.

Here are three specific reasons why objections are not always a bad thing (no specific order):

  • Indicate engagement
  • Allow you to introduce more value/information/facts without pitching
  • Allow you to qualify – disqualify buyers

The goal here is not to specifically give you techniques, but more to get you to relax a bit and see how objections are good for you, your sales, humanity, and global warming.

Keep in mind that for the most part objections come up in two ways, when you are trying to engage or prospect them, (we did a six part series on this, you can find Part I here). The second is when you are trying to gain agreement, either during the sales on specific points that will move things forward, including simple Next Steps, or at the end when you are trying to complete the sale. In either case, what follows will help you put things in a different perspective and let you use the objective to improve your selling, as a whole, and in specific deals.

Indicates Engagement – Even though some objections during the prospecting phase are knee jerk on the part of the buyer, the fact that they “are responding” allows you if prepared, to deal with that objection and segue to a conversation, key is being prepared. As you get into the sale, the objections will be more specific, a direct reflection of what the buyer is thinking, and how they are interpreting what you are saying, and if they are not clear, an opportunity to correct course. Even towards the end, with the lowest form of objection, the price objection, it is an indication that they are involved, capitalize on it.

Allow you to introduce more information/facts/value without pitching – Every time they object, they are in effect asking a question of for clarification, what a bonus. You can get a sense where their thinking is at, introduce additional elements. You can usually go deeper, and more importantly ask for more clarification on the part of the prospect. “Help me understand what you mean by…” Many objections are really questions, or the buyer evaluating things and they vocalize them, it is my chance to recalibrate, add useful value elements, align with the buyer, and move forward.

Allow you to qualify – disqualify buyers – Sellers are always looking to qualify buyers, well their objections are a good qualifier, and as I have argued in the past, if your qualified prospect to closed ration is less than 50%, your time is probably better spent disqualifying those that you know will not close based on experience, which will leave you with more “qualified” buyers. Objections are a great way to disqualify, if you cannot manage and move beyond, you need to accept that it is time to move on, rather than play objection tennis, where you always lose. The big thing is that every time you disqualify a prospect, you have to replace them with a new one. Which is why some sales people would rather pretended they doing productive things by dealing with insurmountable objections, than doing some prospecting.

How you deal with objections is a different post, and there others out there with some great ways. But first you need to deal with how you view objections to begin with.

What’s in Your Pipeline?
Tibor Shanto 

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Why Set Out For 2nd Prize?0

By Tibor Shanto - tibor.shanto@sellbetter.ca

2nd prize

Every day I work with sales people who start their day by setting their sights on winning second prize, and then celebrate when they achieve it. No really, watch any group of sales people on the phone trying to set appointments, and it is only a question of minutes before you see a few telling you how they convinced the potential prospect to let them have second place, or take their place among the also-rans.

Now I am not sure it is always accurate, but there is something to be said for the saying that in sales “second place, is as good as seventh place.” Meaning only the rep who wins the deal has any bragging rights, and the money, the rest are quickly forgotten.

But seriously, how else can you explain sales people doing the following.

They get on the phone, get their indented target on the phone, who tells them “we’re all set, we already have a provider (insert your stuff here), thanks for calling though”. To which the sales rep responds “Well, maybe I can send you some info, and if you ever need a backup…” Sometimes it is a variation on that theme, their whole approach is to get permission to send information to the potential prospect, and then ask for permission to call back to follow up. I mean I could find it interesting if they asked for an appointment to review the material they send, but to ask for permission to call back, don’t we all know what will happen when they call back:

A.   They end up in voice mail, they don’t leave a message, or leave the wrong message; no call back, couple more tries and then they give up
B.   Mysteriously, despite improvements in technology, the prospect did not receive what they sent
C.   The prospect hasn’t had a chance to read, but will, and asks you to call in a week
D.   All of the above

Notice what one of the options wasn’t, that’s right, an appointment, which what the objective is, first prize!

Knowing how to handle objections is one thing, and if you download our Objection Handling Handbook, you’ll know how to handle the two above, (all set, and send me stuff), as well as the most common you are likely to face on the phone. But where most fail is in their attitude, which is really just a symptom of their preparedness and commitment.

While the reality is that most people you speak to will not meet with you first try; it is also true that often that first call is a chance to introduce yourself and initiate a process that may involve a number of calls before you have built enough rapport to have them take a meeting. But it is also true that that should be what you settle for, not your intent going into the call.

Assuming, (not always safe I know), as a seller who values their time and is intent on exceeding quota, you have at least minimally qualified the person and the opportunity before you picked up the phone. The company meets your criteria, you done some background work on the company and the individual you are calling, checked out their social activity, and have prepared for the call. If so, then you objective for the call is to get the meeting to initiate the sale, anything short of that is not a win. And that needs to be the attitude when you are on the phone – you and I need to meet, we’ll both get value!

Not only will that attitude come across on the phone, but it will inform what and how you present things to the buyer. Everything you say driving the need to meet and talk further, that you can add immediate value to their ability to meet their objective. Not in an overt way, but very specifically challenging the prospect to meet, and remember challenge like provoke can be done in a very positive way, it need not be a negative. But most sellers are so scared of the phone, so scared of rejection, so unprepared, they see any permission to end the call as a good one. The difference between the winners and the rest, is that the winners see the meeting as the only good outcome, while the rest want to get off so fast that they see the right to send, second prize, as the best way to achieve their objective, which “How fast can I get off this call without hearing no? Send you some stuff, sure that works, thank you.”

“Hey Boss, I looks like they’re interested, I am putting it at 25%!”

What’s in Your Pipeline?
Tibor Shanto 

Join me - Return On Objectives #Webinar

 

Return On Objectives #Webinar0

Return On Objectives - Harnessing Objectives to Drive Better Sales Conversations

Learn how to change the sales conversation and who should be having that conversation with!

Presented by  

Join me on March 19, at 3:00 pm Eastern.  

Objective Based Selling looks at how to align the conversation with the buyer’s objectives, and leveraging those objectives to create a better conversation that drives mutual opportunities and success. With changes in the buying and selling dynamic, B2B buyers who are ready to buy are much better informed and more empowered than ever, and unless sellers are that much better prepared they risk being reduced to glorified order takers. Buyers who are not in the market, the so called Status Quo, are more time deprived than ever and are much less susceptible to traditional sales approaches and conversations. Impervious to pains, needs or solutions, a large segment of your market is better able to cocoon themselves from traditional sellers and sales conversations.

The presentation will cover how to take advantage of current realities and present specific ways sellers can successfully approach and engage prospects, but create selling opportunities where others may not see any, and in the process build credibility, expert status, and loyalty with existing and new buyers. Objective based selling is a process based, value driven four plank platform for success in selling to Status Quo buyers, the most overlooked segment of the market:

  • Breaking down “Value” to core components and why people buy
  • Leveraging past experiences – Won, Lost and No Decision deals – 360 Degree Deal View
  • Building a better question
  • Proactive exploration

D & R

Customers, Employees and Influencers as High Performing Sales and Marketing Channels1

Beedon Headshot

The Pipeline Guest Post – Dick Beedon

Although brand advocacy has always been important, it is critical today. The path to purchase has changed forever. Because there is so much data available, and because communication is so easy, today’s buyer almost always seeks advice from a trusted friend or consumer source before making a purchase. Brands are now starting to realize that what others say and write about them defines who they are.

Smart brands know they must build strategies and systems to generate, track and manage brand advocacy. They know they must encourage and enable the people that know and trust them – their customers, employees and 3rd party influencers – to advocate on behalf of the brand.

And it works. By encouraging and empowering these customers, employees and influencers, they will drive peer-to-peer referrals, forward content, share information about new products and promotions, and write testimonials. And they can do it at scale and more efficiently than traditional channels.

The Benefits of New Channels are Compelling (examples)

  1. They Build Brand Awareness – when a customer shares something about the brand with a friend, there is no better way of building the brand.
  2. They Generate Leads – those friends that respond and go to the brand for more information become the best leads a brand can get. There are few people on earth who will argue that leads generated from referrals are the best leads. 
  3. They Drive New Customer Acquisition – Leads from referrals close faster, they buy more and they stay longer. 

Other reasons customers, employees and influencers make good sales and marketing channels;

1.  Identify Brand Advocates and Build a Rich “Social” Data Set

Brand Advocates are identified when they register for or engage with your programs. By using technology systems, brands know who “opts-in” and advocates, how often they do it, what their sharing preferences are and how big their network is. We learn who they know and how influential they are. Brands are able to now get a deeper 360 view of their customer’s network value.

2. You’ll Know when Potential Customers are “In-Market”
Social channels provide insights and information not previously available. At the most basic level, social channels extend a brand’s sales force (with zero overhead) and they solve one of the biggest challenges brand’s face: knowing when a potential buyer is in-market. Only your current customers know when the people they know are ready to buy.
3. The cost of acquisition is lower.
This channel is always on and continually active – making referrals, amplifying products and promotions, and posting positive information about your brand. Brand advocates do this for a brand because they trust the brand and they want do it. Therefore, the time and cost invested into this channel is significantly less than other channels.
4. New customers that are referred by someone in your Social Channel are Valuable.
Research has consistently shown that consumers who convert as a result of a referral from a friend, are more loyal to a brand, spend more and stay longer.

Who are your Potential Channels and how Well can they Perform?

Customers, partners and employees are the fastest growing sales and marketing channel today. By utilizing the latest in social marketing software and technology, business leaders can mobilize these social relationships to generate new customers, and they can track and manage social behavior that is critical to the success of their company.

Customers recommend your products because they have first-hand, positive experience with them.

Today’s truly successful companies understand the importance of leveraging their customers into sales and marketing channels that drive corporate productivity. Creating and cultivating a large group of advocates can: pay huge dividends in the growth of your brand, increase subscribers, and boost profits. The financial investment to create this channel is minimal when you compare it to the long-term payoff for the brand.

About Richard Beedon

Richard Beedon is a founder and CEO of Amplifinity.  Beedon has led the acquisition of both Entyre Doc Prep (by Wolters Kluwer) and University Netcasting, who merged with Student Advantage (now collegesports.com) and was acquired by CBS. Dick’s thought leadership and early adaption of SaaS based technologies that allow brands to manage advocacy marketing has been instrumental in the success and growth of Amplifinity.

Webinar: Time – Prospecting And Getting the Jump on Both!0

d-orsay-clock_3

On Tuesday February 4, I will be presenting a webinar Along with the good folks at eGrabber – “Time – Prospecting – And Getting the Jump On Both” I’ll be talking to the importance of sourcing the right leads, information about the individual and their companies, and securing the right and accurate contact information so you can engage with the right person for the right conversation.

There are a lot of critical steps to engaging new B2B customers. Two of the most common challenges is finding the right target, and then engaging with them. Every day I meet sales people challenged by finding the right contact, their contact info and related information. Even if you use LinkedIn or other tools, you need to be able to connect directly.

This webinar we will introduce tools & techniques on how to find contact information for people you don’t yet know, and then how to engage with them:

1. Find missing Email & Phone# for any social profile.
2. Find Director, VP and C-Level, decision makers in any company.
3. Build a highly targeted B2B prospect list with business e-mail and phone#.
4. Do Pre-call Research, Get Insightful Prospect Information.

Click here to register

We’ll be looking at the combination of cutting edge tools available from eGrabber to help you make prospecting more time efficient and productive. Time is the only unrenewable resource you have, the better you use it the more success you will have. Improve your rate of connecting with the right decision makers, and you will increase prospects, sales and profits. We will be sharing best practices and everyday techniques for improved prospecting.

Click here to register

The 3 Legs of Sales Success0

By Tibor Shanto - tibor.shanto@sellbetter.ca

Stool Success

As you finalise your 2014 sales plans, it is good idea to review and commit to some of the basics. Some of these may not be fashionable, on the other hand nothing is more fashionable in sales than exceeding quota.

As with many endeavours, we sometime focus too much effort on style and take our eyes of the fundamentals. As Michael Jordan once said:

“…You have to monitor your fundamentals constantly because the only thing that changes will be your attention to them”

While the framework for the fundamentals are process and quality of execution, the key fundamentals that we need to continuous focus on regardless of methodology or approach are:

  • Size of Sale (or order)
  • Volume of Sales
  • Price integrity

Size of Sale – Refers to the specific size of the order, specifically in two forms. One is the result of the type of prospects you pursue; if you are selling stuff measured in units, the larger the target company, the more units they will require. Since in most instances, the effort required to sell a $50 million dollar/40 employee company, is often not that different than selling a $100 million/100 employee company, why not focus on the larger end of the scale. A variation on this is a recent example from a company I worked with. They found that of the three batteries they sold, the mid-range one was the best product/value for the price, for both the customers and them, but people tended to opt for the entry level battery. They discontinued offering the bottom end, their unit sales did not decline, and their revenue and margins increased.

It is no different if you are selling services, if you target companies that can ‘consume’ more of what you sell, you will sell more by avoiding those who consume less. Since the time you have to make the sales does not change, why not target those opportunities that can give you size or scale. You can always go down stream once you have sold the ideal size first.

Volume of Sales – this is different than the first point, it goes more to how many sales you get irrespective of size. If right now you are doing four deals a month, and were to increase that to say 4 ½ deals per month, you would move to 54 sales a year, a 12% increase. Even if you have a long cycle, big ticket, say only six sales a year, increase it to 7, may not sound like much, but.

This involves better use of time, primarily through the discipline of disqualifying those opportunities that will not close now, they may close a year from now or even in the summer, just not now. This is where your process gives you the confidence to say no, rather than spending time to try and get a yes where one does not exist. Like the old gold rush 49ers, the quicker they got rid of the sand and stones, the quicker they got to the gold, increasing their daily take. Get rid of the crap in your pipeline, and you’ll work with more gold.

Price Integrity – as straight forward as it gets, the less we concede the more we succeed. Resist the temptation to “give a good price to get in”, because you will never recover.

As you evaluate your opportunities, it is important to consider how any or all of the above can be leveraged to deliver better and consistent results, and how misalignment can be detrimental to success.

With all of the above methodology and improved execution will help you sell more to more of the right people, but merely adopting a methodology without target one of the three elements above is not enough. You may want to start by targeting one, or better yet explore opportunities that allow you to move the dial on all. We use a simple matrix allowing clients to plot opportunities based on these elements with the added element of time. This allows them to visualize and focus on the right number of highest value opportunities sold at full price.

Everything we do in sales should have a positive impact on one or all of those three elements. It is when we take our eyes off these fundamentals, that the level of effort, training, coach or other initiatives, will always be greater than the results. The start of the year, (quarter, month, day) is a good time to refocus.

What’s in Your Pipeline?
Tibor Shanto

Leveraging Price Ratio To Win The Right Deals1

By Tibor Shanto - tibor.shanto@sellbetter.ca

Rpl round

Pricing continues to be a key factor in winning or losing sales opportunities, and while few vendors take pride in being the low cost provider, at times it seems they set out to be just that, or they take few steps to avoid it being forced on them. There are times when companies consciously use price as a temporary strategy to gain market share, or directly impact a competitor. Rarely have I met a VP of Sales who says:

“We’ve decided to be the cheapest on the block, so long as we don’t go broke, I want you to teach my guys how to get to the price discussion quickly, demonstrate just enough value to justify that price, and then let our ops team manage diminished expectations.”

I say rarely, because I have met leaders who seem to work like that, but don’t articulate that way. I have met consultants who suggest “win the business on price, and then keep it on service.” The challenge is that few can recoup the concessions and get the price back up to where it should be and are stuck at that lower price band, and corresponding margins. Of course during the next vendor selection round they may have to lower the cost just to keep the account, or replace it, when someone undercuts them. Either way expectations have been set.

No matter what many will tell you, it is more often about buyer’s perception about the relationship (as in relative to, not relationship as in the soft-sell mantra) between price and expectations, and not price and deliverables. Promise great – but then deliver only good, and you could suffer; promise good and deliver good, you meet expectations. This is why “under promise – over deliver”, still works.

The fact that it is more about expectations rather than deliverables is actually a good thing for those sellers willing to sell value rather than price. In the past I have shared the ”Actionable Definition” of Value; it centers the conversation, the sale, on the buyer’s objectives, which gives one the opportunity to leverage the give and take between price, value and expectations.

One of the first things we need to understand and establish during the Discovery stage of the sale, is the buyer’s specific ratio of value/expectations to price; think of it as their level of conviction. Here is how it works, buyers are looking for maximum price concessions while giving up the least amount of value. If they can get the seller to give up one unit of price, while at the same time they give up less than a unit of value in return, then they perceive themselves to be ahead, and the ratio is less than one. Based on experience, this tends to be the case the majority of time. If the reduction of value is equal to the price reduction then it is one-to-one.

What’s interesting is that it is this same ratio that has led some value driven vendors lose deals they feel they should win against lower cost providers, the ratio works in the lower cost provider’s favour. They are willing to give up “the right little bit” of service for a greater savings. The key for you is to understand not only what those element are, but where they rank for the buyer. This will vary for each buyer, which why focusing on objective is a must, and not taking a cookie cutter “solutions” or the usual consultative approach, which will leave them short and disappointed every time.

If all that wasn’t enough to manage and deal with, you also need to clearly understand your competitors, their offering and cost structure. Incremental improvements in process and technology, can change the landscape, competitors may be in a position to deliver the same level of service as before but a reduced cost, and when that occurs, they can leverage the ratio in a way that creates a win-win with buyer, and a lose-lose for you.
As with most things in sales, once you incorporate this line of thinking into your repertoire, you can also use it to disqualify buyers who are purely price driven and will suck every concession out of you without reciprocating in any way. While everyone is trying to economize, smart companies and worthy partners understand that a weakened supplier is not good for anyone in the long run. Without profits, R&D, innovation and other value elements will suffer and by extension so will the buyer’s business.

The price dance is not going away anytime soon, but understanding core blocks of price, and how it relates to the buyer’s expectations and more importantly their objectives will help you build value based relationships that will last long enough for you to get a good payback on what it cost you to acquire the client, and work with buyers who understand that profits are important throughout the ecosystem.

What’s in Your Pipeline?
Tibor Shanto 

How Much Revenue Did You Lose at Quarter End?0

By Tibor Shanto - tibor.shanto@sellbetter.ca

Impact Question

There is an all too familiar ritual that unfolds at the end of every fiscal period, for some it is monthly, for most it is quarterly, and at year end. Being that Monday was quarter end, I was reminded again. A friend who is a rep with a technology company, cancelled a meeting we had set for this afternoon, and you know it, his voice mail this morning at 8:00 simply said, “Man, I need to change our meeting, last day of the quarter, you know how it is.”

On the one hand I do, on the other hand I don’t. I am sorry if your quarter comes down to the last day of the quarter, a Monday of all days, there is a whole bunch of things you are doing wrong, and a bunch of money you are leaving on the table.

To start with, a good number of the deals that are “Driven in” on the 30th of September, will happen because of some concession made by the seller to the buyer. Sometimes these are small things, baked in specifically so they can be “conceded”, often not. These can be a price concessions, either in the form of a price adjustment, or the inclusion of goods or services that normally would have had a price tag, but being the last day of the quarter, “and we need to bring in the numbers”, they are thrown in to secure the deal “today”. Although once you offer it, it’ll be there October 2, or even next week, the buyer has seen weakness and will not give it back. And – it will be the first of many to come, you’ve set the precedent, both you and the buyer have been conditioned.

Not only do you never see that money again, but there is the lost momentum and opportunities as you deviate from your routine, stop prospecting for a few days as you focus on closing. May not seem that bad, but if you don’t prospect for a few days, you’ll create weakness in your pipeline, and when the next quarter end comes around, guess what. So now you are out the revenue you gave away in concessions, and the revenue from prospects you will either never have, or will closer later than they could have.

The alternative is requires a bit more discipline, but results in less of a roller coaster ride and more money! It comes down to owning your time and being accountable for your actions, (grab this e-book for details). If you know your conversion rate at critical stages of the cycle, you can focus on executing the key tasks you have to throughout the cycle, and not sweat the days. Some things in sales are straight forward, if you have a three month cycle, and you close one of every five deals you qualify into your pipeline, it doesn’t take much to see how this quarter end dance will hurt. If you don’t prospect from the 27th to the 30th (of any quarter), then your next sale will be delayed by so many days. Sure you can make up for it in some ways, but then you’ll have other distractions, the ones you can’t help, but this one you can.

What’s in Your Pipeline?
Tibor Shanto 

 

Red Light Calls – Sales eXchange 2191

By Tibor Shanto - tibor.shanto@sellbetter.ca

redlight

No no no, I am not switching from the second oldest profession to the oldest, but rather speaking about how to make small efforts pay off big. A Red Light Call is simply a call you can make while stopped at a red light driving between appointments or wherever. While it can be thought of being in the same group as Coma Calls, they are different. Red Light Calls can be used in a number of ways to help with a few specific scenarios.

First is to get closer to engaging with potential buyers. Depending on who you read, it could take anywhere from 8 to 12 or more touch points to just connect or engage with a potential prospect. A recent article I read from a credible source, suggested that her recent findings show an average of 8.4 tough points are required in B2B sales. The assumption is that you are ready for the call, know the talk track, salient points you want to hit, and it is just down to getting that other person “on the line”. These touch points can be a combination of e-mail, telephone/voice mail, text messages, snail mail, whatever you can think of, they should vary in the time carried out.

In the majority of instances, I am just looking to set an appointment with the person I am call, understanding that it is unrealistic to complete a quality call on an initial cold call, but it is more than doable to set an appointment where they commit to set aside time to at least listen to you, this can be either face to face or phone. I don’t need to be at my desk to make this appointment call, in fact if I wait for that, it may be hard to vary the times of the call. So one place to be efficient in the use of time and improve you odds is to call when stuck at a red light.

PSA: please take advantage of hands free technology to dial the number, don’t want you to get a ticket or worse.

You’re less inclined to talk, and therefore will be more inclined to focus on getting the appointment and selling from a position of strength. Even if you don’t connect with the party, you can still leave a voice mail, and complete another touch point; but if you connect….

The other great Red Light Call, are those elusive prospects who you just can’t seem to get a hold off in the office, or prospects who have gone “radio silent” in the middle of a sale. There is a certain quality to random calls, not to mention the ability to be productive during “windshield time”.

There is also the benefit of not being trapped to routine. While I am a big fan of structure and planning, there is also a risk of being trapped by it. We get used to a set of behaviours that become habit, and habits can be good or limiting. Including an element of random activities, allows you to make the most of structure, but at the same time do things the schedule does not always allow for. While you can make the most of calling time in the office to focus on your primary targets, Red Light Calls, allow you to go for third tier or other long shots. There goes the light, good bye.

What’s in Your Pipeline?
Tibor Shanto

3 Things Some Pundits Won’t Tell you about Cold Calling – Part 20

By Tibor Shanto - tibor.shanto@sellbetter.ca

Old Phone

On Monday, in the first post of this series, we defined “cold calling”, and looked at overlooked real opportunities for sales and revenues one misses when not including cold calling in their biz dev routine.

Whether by fate or chance, the following definition was contained in a marketing piece I received in my inbox yesterday:

“By definition, “Cold Calling” is the marketing process of approaching prospective customers or clients, typically via telephone, who were not expecting such an interaction. The word “cold” is used because the person receiving the call is not expecting a call or has not specifically asked to be contacted by a sales person.”

I guess I am not alone.

On to number two!

2.   They may not do it now, but they used to!

I’ll start by asking a variation on the question about the tree falling in the forest:

If one outsources their cold calling or delegates it to someone else in his/her company, are they still cold calling or could they claim to be pure?

In all the years I’ve been selling, I have only met one person who claims never to have made a cold call during their career (let’s qualify that, successful career), and while I believe that the captain of commerce in question, I also suspect that he is the exception that proves the rule. The rule being that cold calling is a key and necessary (evil) part of successful B2B selling.

I usually start my Proactive Prospecting workshops by asking “Who here can make quota strictly from their base and referrals from that base?” On average less than a third put up their hands; usually not the top third, and I am usually distracted by their manager’s shaking head.

At the start of their career or new job, most sellers make cold calls. Then we change, more accurately, the market and success changes us. We build a base of clients, service and support them, do all the things we are supposed to. In the process of doing that, our work habits and attitudes change. That change usually involves a slow shift from being primarily a hunter, we slowly morph to being hybrid hunter/maintainer. Our work continues to bear fruit, we stop sharpening our cold calling skills and sharpen our referral skills, and completely stop exercising our cold calling muscles, and let’s face we are all happy not having to do the dreaded task.

Some can sustain their career from harvesting their base, even as their companies are starving for new customers. Pundits can live off their reputation, and declare cold calling dead.

But then reality comes to call, in the form of a lost client, or the economic climate of 2009 – 2011, the base no longer spins the rewards it used to, no choice but to find some new streams of revenue. I see this pattern play itself out at my gym, some keener who was on the high school football team but has not picked up the ball, weights or ran in the last 12 years. He now decides it’s time to shed some pounds by hitting the gym, sweat band and all. After five minutes on the elliptical, they are breathless, soaked and declare “this doesn’t work”; they dash off to the nearest pharmacy for a bottle of Hydroxycut Special, because it really works.

As with fitness, what really works is a balanced approach, I worked with a successful banker, loans to small and medium businesses, he had a great book after 17 years in the business, easily leave off it for the remainder of his career. But he would cold call several times a week, when I asked why, he said:

“First, if I bring on one new client a month, I will generate five more in the form of referrals from that one over the next year, and more off those in the coming years. Second, like it or not, I will lose some clients, retirement, acquisition, failure, or what have you. Adding new companies to my book, allows me to continue to grow it.”

Ask yourself what your attrition rate is, and more importantly, how much upside is there in replacing them with new networks of revenue.

I often ask the cold calling is dead crowd, what advice they would give a young and/or new territory rep, new to a copier, transport, wireless, telco, MRO, or other similar company, not the 10 years veteran, but brand new rep: cold call or not? I don’t often hear back, mostly because a balanced, well thought-out action plan has to include cold calls, referrals, LinkedIn, and every available and effective tool. To exclude one, is to limit your success. Just like they used to.

What’s in Your Pipeline?
Tibor Shanto

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