To Call or Not9

By Tibor Shanto - tibor.shanto@sellbetter.ca

Touch

I am often asked a question I really hate, and while I have learned not to let it get on my nerves, and usually manage to deal with it calmly, it still pains me that my fellow professional sellers would ask it. The question relates to how vigorously one should pursue a potential prospect? I find the question bizarre on a number of levels, not the least of which is that today’s potential; prospect is tomorrow’s prospect, next week’s customer, and a stream of revenue (if not commissions) for some time after that. Ya, you should pursue it vigorously.

I am have a hard time not screaming when a sales person asks me “Should I call that prospect or not, I called him a couple of weeks ago, he didn’t call back, I guess he is not interested.” No, from where I sit, it is the sales person making that statement who is not interested. If they were, they’d be reaching out to the potential prospect, not asking the question. Not only do they lack the interest, but a good and executable pursuit plan needed to engage the potential prospect and start a mutually satisfactory relationship.

Consider the following:

48% Of Sales People Never Follow Up with a Prospect
25% Of Sales People Make a Second Contact and Stop
12% Of Sales People Make a Third Contact and Stop
Only 10% Of Sales People Make More Than Three Contacts
2% Of Sales Are Made On the First Contact
3% Of Sales Are Made On the Second Contact
5% Of Sales Are Made On the Third Contact
10% Of Sales Are Made On the Fourth Contact
80% Of Sales Are Made On the Fifth to Twelfth Contact

It is clear that the answer is not whether you should make the call (e-mail, tweet, smoke signal…) or not, but how many times, and what will you communicate. It is one things know how to spell nurture, another to execute it well

A good pursuit plan maps out how many touch points you will execute, in what sequence and frequency. Frequency is an important often overlooked or mismanaged factor. These touch-points should be made in a much narrower timeframe than many recognize or feel comfortable with. If you set out a pursuit plan that includes say eight touch-points, which is a median number, some go higher, some go lower, if you’re going to err, err on the higher end, so eight is about right. The time horizon should be between three to four weeks at the max. Long gaps, a week or two will just diminish the compounding effect of the touch-points.

When looking to connect with someone you have had no direct contact with, two or three touches a week are necessary, but most people don’t want to do more than one a week, you may as well not bother. One of the reasons they don’t call you back is you are allowing them to forget about you, and more importantly what you are trying to engage them around. That combined with the fact that you lose focus, and allow your attention to wonder during the long gaps.

The other key component is the combination of content, and medium. While I still think that Marshall McLuhan, would have been a lousy sales person, because it is the message that drives revenue, the medium does count. A combination of phone, e-mail, text, LinkedIn, tweets, introductions, smoke signals, you name it. No single touch should overwhelm the recipient, remember the goal is to engage directly not to sell. The content should entice the recipient to engage, while each may build on the other, the goal is to have the opportunity to complete the picture directly, even if it takes a few tries.

What’s in Your Pipeline?
Tibor Shanto 

Share

Why Set Out For 2nd Prize?0

By Tibor Shanto - tibor.shanto@sellbetter.ca

2nd prize

Every day I work with sales people who start their day by setting their sights on winning second prize, and then celebrate when they achieve it. No really, watch any group of sales people on the phone trying to set appointments, and it is only a question of minutes before you see a few telling you how they convinced the potential prospect to let them have second place, or take their place among the also-rans.

Now I am not sure it is always accurate, but there is something to be said for the saying that in sales “second place, is as good as seventh place.” Meaning only the rep who wins the deal has any bragging rights, and the money, the rest are quickly forgotten.

But seriously, how else can you explain sales people doing the following.

They get on the phone, get their indented target on the phone, who tells them “we’re all set, we already have a provider (insert your stuff here), thanks for calling though”. To which the sales rep responds “Well, maybe I can send you some info, and if you ever need a backup…” Sometimes it is a variation on that theme, their whole approach is to get permission to send information to the potential prospect, and then ask for permission to call back to follow up. I mean I could find it interesting if they asked for an appointment to review the material they send, but to ask for permission to call back, don’t we all know what will happen when they call back:

A.   They end up in voice mail, they don’t leave a message, or leave the wrong message; no call back, couple more tries and then they give up
B.   Mysteriously, despite improvements in technology, the prospect did not receive what they sent
C.   The prospect hasn’t had a chance to read, but will, and asks you to call in a week
D.   All of the above

Notice what one of the options wasn’t, that’s right, an appointment, which what the objective is, first prize!

Knowing how to handle objections is one thing, and if you download our Objection Handling Handbook, you’ll know how to handle the two above, (all set, and send me stuff), as well as the most common you are likely to face on the phone. But where most fail is in their attitude, which is really just a symptom of their preparedness and commitment.

While the reality is that most people you speak to will not meet with you first try; it is also true that often that first call is a chance to introduce yourself and initiate a process that may involve a number of calls before you have built enough rapport to have them take a meeting. But it is also true that that should be what you settle for, not your intent going into the call.

Assuming, (not always safe I know), as a seller who values their time and is intent on exceeding quota, you have at least minimally qualified the person and the opportunity before you picked up the phone. The company meets your criteria, you done some background work on the company and the individual you are calling, checked out their social activity, and have prepared for the call. If so, then you objective for the call is to get the meeting to initiate the sale, anything short of that is not a win. And that needs to be the attitude when you are on the phone – you and I need to meet, we’ll both get value!

Not only will that attitude come across on the phone, but it will inform what and how you present things to the buyer. Everything you say driving the need to meet and talk further, that you can add immediate value to their ability to meet their objective. Not in an overt way, but very specifically challenging the prospect to meet, and remember challenge like provoke can be done in a very positive way, it need not be a negative. But most sellers are so scared of the phone, so scared of rejection, so unprepared, they see any permission to end the call as a good one. The difference between the winners and the rest, is that the winners see the meeting as the only good outcome, while the rest want to get off so fast that they see the right to send, second prize, as the best way to achieve their objective, which “How fast can I get off this call without hearing no? Send you some stuff, sure that works, thank you.”

“Hey Boss, I looks like they’re interested, I am putting it at 25%!”

What’s in Your Pipeline?
Tibor Shanto 

Join me - Return On Objectives #Webinar

 

Best time to Prospect – Sales eXecution 2391

By Tibor Shanto - tibor.shanto@sellbetter.ca

time management

One question I am asked regularly is what is the best time to prospect, be that of day, time of week, etc. While trying to avoid the word depends, there are some variables that will impact the answer.  But what many are really looking for for is that secret answer, “call them at 4:33 on a the third Tuesday of the month, except I. A leap year, then it’s 4:36″.

While with some potential prospects there may be times that will yield more results, I believe it is not a good idea to look for one time over another, especially when that time is selected anecdotally, based on superstition, or as a means of avoiding the activity altogether.  I say this not to be cynical, but because I have seen people target a specific time, and then refuse to make calls at any other time.

Some sellers tell me emphatically that “you can’t prospect on Monday mornings, no way no how”.  Their rationale is that people are just getting back to work after the weekend and “have their minds on other important things”.  But when is that not the case given all the things the average business person has to juggle?  As with many things, there two side to every coin, I find my target audience uses the weekend to decompress, and on Monday are open to the right suggestion(s) as to how to move sales and salespeople forward, for me Monday mornings have proven to be productive.  I have also had just as many people swear that Friday afternoons are the best, as those who tell me its the worst.  

Some struggle to strike a balance between their own habits and those of their targets.  Many sales pundits will insist that you should prospect first thing in the day, giving a bounce to your day, allowing you to spend the rest of  it selling. The theory is sound, in practice it is not alway so.  I worked with an industrial supply company, they had a great work ethic, their manager instilled a prospecting discipline, on the phone from 7:45 am to 9:00 am, every day.  Their conversion rate from conversation to appointment was great, but they were finding it difficult to connect to have the conversations. When I got involved we stepped back and focused on the work habits of their target group, senior people in plant management and operations. What surfaced was that many of these people were either out on the “shop floor”, or in operations meetings first thing in the morning, around the same time my client’s team was diligently calling. Further, we learned that many of the targets were back in their office around 10:00 am, filling out reports, etc.

As a result of this I had them switch their “calling time” to 10:00 am; their conversion of conversation to appointment continued to be great, but their call to conversation rate tripled.  This increased the number of appointments to record levels, but had the added benefit of reducing the amount of time they actually had to spend on the activity. Think of it as a “double double” of prospecting.  As with all things sales, it is so much better to view the world through the buyer’s eyes.

Given that there are more ways to communicate with buyers than ever, there less reason than ever to think of “best times” to prospect. Given that you can send an e-mail or LiknkedIn inmail any time, or that you can schedule e-mail to go out at a pre-scheduled time, you are no longer tied to time,  A well placed voicemail in off hours can yield great returns, without it impacting your “selling time”.  Rather than spending energy to pinpoint the ultimate time to call, use that energy to create quality talking points for when you connect.

Unless you are doing something specific and measurable to realize revenue, (a retweet does not count), the best time to prospect is now.

What’s in Your Pipeline?
Tibor Shanto 

Unavoidable – Sales eXecution 2380

By Tibor Shanto - tibor.shanto@sellbetter.ca

change

One of the most frequent questions I am asked all start with “How do I avoid…?” Many are surprised when I respond “Why do you want to avoid it?” The answer is obvious, they either don’t know how to deal with something, so they look for ways to avoid it. Or the know how to avoid it, but don’t want to do what it takes for number of reasons.

The former is easily fixed, they can be taught, they put things into practice, and over time they don’t even remember that they were trying to avoid it, and now speak like experts. The latter is a bit of a challenge, all too common challenge.

Some things you can avoid, in Renbor’s Objection Handling Handbook, I talk about specific way to present things to prospects, especially while prospecting that allows us to steer the discussion in a certain direction, or better yet, initiate the conversation in a way that eliminates a specific objection. For example, (and there are others in the book), when you follow up on information you sent a prospect, and they say “Haven’t gotten around to reading it yet, give me a call next week”, you can take that away and avoid the objection by starting your call like this:

“Bob, it’s Susie, I am following up on the information I sent you as you requested last week, you probably haven’t had a chance to read it yet, have you?” Just the nervous laughter is worth the call alone, but you have avoided the response by taking it away.

But there will be things in sales, unpleasant things, which not only you can’t avoid, but should not want to avoid. People want to find a way to avoid the most common objections while telephone prospecting. I can understand why, but I would argue that there is more upside in learning how to deal with it, and benefit from that, and benefit in a much more profitable way than if you were able to avoid the objections.

For the sake of full disclosure, there is one proven sure proof way to avoid objections faced in telephone prospect, works every time, but it does have big risk associated with it, really big risk. The method is not to make the call. Works every time, and oddly the chosen method of many. One just needs to look at some of the “be found” stuff being offered as practical ways to generate engagement and prospects.

The side effects, are fewer opportunities, and missed quotas, in my view, infinitely worse than any punishment faced while prospecting. Just today I got a note in my inbox from CSO Insight, that only 58.2% of reps attained quota. Give me a stern “not interested”, or “I am good, all set”. That I can deal with, take away the objection and drive engagement.

The other dark side of trying to avoid things, is that you fail to set in to motion other practical elements of a sale. Sure you avoid the discomfort of one thing, but that prevents you from getting to what is behind it. Does the old expression, “you need to crack a few eggs”, remind you of anything? You need to hit that first domino

The biggest down and dark side, is that failure at times is the cost of growth. None of us learned to ride a bike, play hockey, or ask someone on a date without falling a few times. You may succeed in avoiding some unpleasantries, but mostly you’ll avoid success.

Note – someone pointed out that I have been deliver the Sales eXchange for the last 200 plus weeks, and while there is information exchanged, the topics and the themes are more around sales execution. And with their input I have introduced a slight change to the series, and moving forward it will be called Sales eXecution! Because after all in sales, it is about Execution – everything else is just talk!

What’s in Your Pipeline?
Tibor Shanto

 

Cold Calling is “IN” Again! – Sales eXchange 2346

By Tibor Shanto - tibor.shanto@sellbetter.ca

frozen calls

Sadly I am at an age where I find myself saying “I remember the first time that was cool”, I have seen thin ties come and go enough times enough time to know not to throw out any ties, because it is only a question of time before someone says, “wow, that’s a cool tie, is it new?” The only thing I can’t remember if it was 1987, 1993 or 2007 when I actually first bought it.

Well it seems that cold calling is coming back into fashion. Not only do you find people dropping euphemisms when referring to the activity, companies popping up all over the place to perform a service many are needing but forgot how to execute. Many closet callers are coming out and proudly proclaiming not only that they regularly part take in cold calling, but that it producing results that exceed the expectations many, and helping many exceed quota.

Amazing what an Arctic Vortex will do.  Here we are less than two weeks into the New Year, and the signs are all over that cold calling is cool again. Just last week I had a notice for a webinar from one of the original Sales 2.0 gang, inviting me to a webinar on cold calling.  BTW, if you want to attend a webinar from someone who never wavered from cold calling, click here.

Other pundits who not so long ago wrapped themselves in the Sales 2.0 cloak, before dawning top layer of social selling, are now shedding their load, and freely speaking about the virtues of cold calling.

What is truly refreshing in some of their proclamations, is not so much their embracement of this staple and age old tool of sales success, but more importantly their abandonment of the “Us vs. Them” dribble that often dominates the debate.  The former stance that cold calling is dead, and it is all about the new thing, is now more reasoned and tempered, and sounds more like those of us who were out in the cold for a while.  Namely that it is about a blend of approaches and means of engaging with potential buyers, not one means vs. another.

Maybe it has more to do with the fact that the economy is showing some life, revenue expectations by Wall Street and companies themselves, are causing people to realise that they will need to be more than found if they are going to make quota, they’re actually going to have to go out and find some potential buyers who are not currently in the market or expressed that they may care to be.

In a recent LinkedIn group discussion asking if cold calling is dead or not, the comments were absent of the usual posturing about how cold calling was bad or dead.  The tone was more logical, again, putting cold calling alongside social selling and other techniques and tools that make up a successful tool kit.

LinkedIn itself, seems to be leading the charge back.  Despite a recent article “Cold Calling is Dead, Thanks To LinkedIn”, seems to have jumped on the band wagon.  As with most leaders and pundits, the measure of their commitment lies in what they do, not always in what they say.  Since a picture is worth 1,000 words, let me point to a recent advert for a sales position at LinkedIn, promoted on LinkedIn. When it comes to Responsibilities, just look at what is number one on the list:

LinkIn CC wr

About the only thing that could make cold calling more fashionable is to call it Zombie Calling!

What’s in Your Pipeline?
Tibor Shanto

Cold Calling: How to get from Interruption to Conversation #Webinar0

laser phone

Having a pipeline of good prospects is important at any time, but that much more at the start of the year. What with the year-end rush to close deals, the holiday break, sellers often find their opportunities deplete, leading to a lull.

The answer is a solid, proven, road tested methodology that will help you fill any gaps you may have in your pipeline, and keep you on track moving forward.

To help you, I am will presenting a webinar on January 30, at 3:00 pm Eastern, for Fearless Selling, titled “Cold Calling: How to get from Interruption to Conversation”. Hosted by Kelley Robertson, I will be presenting and sharing the key elements and practices of a proactive prospecting approach that can be put into practice by most B2B sales professional.

Contrary to what pundits tell you, cold calling is not dead, it is thriving and delivering sales opportunities for those willing to include it in their broader prospecting tool kit.

We will cover core elements of telephone prospecting success, including:

  • Developing client/prospect objectives (this is critical yet most sales people don’t do it)
  • How to allot and best manage your time
  • Mastering the language of sales
  • Understanding the role of conversion rates and how to improve them
  • Develop an effective approach for engaging with prospects and setting appointments
  • Create company and individual opening approach (Talk Track)
  • How to effectively manage common and recurring objections
  • Master voice mails that get return calls (this topic alone could be worth your investment!)

Learn more and register now by clicking here.

One of the biggest obstacles to sales success is procrastination, beat it now by signing up for the webinar!

Go For That Hail Mary Now – Sales eXchange 2331

By Tibor Shanto - tibor.shanto@sellbetter.ca

Hail Mary

When we hear the phrase Hail Mary, we think of the end of half or end of game, a last chance play or pass, a buzzer beater, usually accompanied by some level of desperation (perceived or real). This a ritual not limited to sports, it is practiced in B2B sales, but under different names, fueled by the same need, and with all the same negative connotations; the end is nigh, and you know the drill. We’ve all seen it or lived through it, the end of quarter (or other sales period) deal coral and round up time. All rules and reason go out the window, it is all about the close; your manager’s vocabulary is reduced to four words, “Have you closed _________?”, no vacations, and god forbid if your wife goes into labour before the 31st.

Don’t get me wrong, there is nothing wrong with long shots, this is more about which, why and when. I love long shots, some of my best opportunities resulted from me taking a shot on things others ignored, or by taking an approach everyone would have bet will lead to disaster. But you have to pick them, because as we have said here repeatedly, time is a non-renewable resource. But they are long shots for a reason, and you need to select them for the right reason, and more importantly make sure you select them, rather than them selecting you, in the form of an all or none situation.

Long shots should be over and above the real opportunities in your pipeline rather than the only things in the pipe. This allows you to stretch, experiment and discover new ways to sell without bringing unnecessary risk to your quarter year, or overall success. With a blended pipeline with ample coverage, long shots are fun, and can be rewarding. When approached as a bonus, they allow you to explore new sectors, prospect new people, and expand your repertoire, expand markets, and open new referral channels.

Plan your long shots with the understanding that will need a lot of run way. Why most sales Hail Mary’s fail is that they are not given enough time to unfold properly. Instead of waiting for the last Wednesday of the quarter, start your pursuit on the first day, start two, as chances are that at best one may work. But make sure you start with enough time to have a “shot”.

Make sure you not only have a plan B and C, and beyond. Just due to the nature of these opportunities, you are likely going to need a plan G, M and maybe even a plan T (plan T;s are my favourite).

One of the things I enjoy most about Hail Mary’s is the opportunity to talk to people in roles I don’t normally deal with, and in types of accounts outside my normal ones. This is not only challenging in a way that allows me to sharpen skills, but is fun, and you do have to have fun. When I win, there is more than money, and if I lose, well it is not my core pipeline.

So yes, take the long shot, go for the Hail Mary, but do it now, not March 25.

What’s in Your Pipeline?
Tibor Shanto

Exceeding Your Sales Expectations0

By Tibor Shanto - tibor.shanto@sellbetter.ca

Solar Scape

Many adhere to the saying that goes “perception is reality”, no arguing that, but for sales professionals the mantra needs to be “Expectations are reality”. Regular sales people let their perceptions dictate their reality, and are often limited by their own perceptions, those of their buyers’, and of course the perceptions they glean from the pundits’. As a result they often settle for things they perceive, rather than achieving the things they can do given the right expectations.

I was working with a reps last week, helping him be more effective on the phone in the process of setting appointments. While he got the words and the flow of the approach and talk track down quickly, he was still not getting traction, especially when compared to others. What he was lacking was conviction and the dynamics that come with that.

Those dynamics, nuances in attitude and delivery, can make the difference between another prospecting call, and an appointment. The better the call, the more appointments; the more choice you have in your pipeline and your success. One specific is the attitude you have about the outcome, which directly influenced by what you expect to happen on and as a result of the call.

His expectations were all focused on the negative less than fun side of the call. He expected to get voice mail rather than a live person, he expected to be greeted by the admin or what sales people like to call gate keepers, (talk about setting the battle lines with labels). If those hurdles didn’t pop up, he expected the target to be irritated, not interested, and almost pissed for getting the call. If he got past that, he expected objections by the boat load, and finally he expected that there was little he could say to take away the objections and get the appointment.

I felt for him, he was piling up all these limiting obstacles, and he hadn’t even looked at the phone, no wonder it seemed like a five ton dumbbell. I suggested he had reset his expectations. “To what” he asked, “what are your expectations when you make calls?”

“I expect to get the appointment”

Those words are not magic, I still need to deliver an effective introduction, and while I get objections like the rest, I expect to deal with them and get past them. My expectations are focused on the outcome, the appointment, the opportunity in the pipeline, the sales, the commission and the meal at my favourite restaurant, I can taste that vindaloo now. If you expect to meet and be defeated by obstacles, then that is what you’ll get, and that will dictate your perception, and the reality of your effort.

Sure perception is reality, and if your perception is that you can’t do it, prospecting doesn’t work, then that will be your reality. If you expect to get the appointment, expect to get the next step, expect to win the deal, then that will inform your preparation, actions, reactions and outcomes. Those who set expectations, and settle for nothing less than what they expect can go further and overcome more hurdles more effectively than those guided by perceptions. What are your expectations today?

What’s in Your Pipeline?
Tibor Shanto 

Red Light Calls – Sales eXchange 2191

By Tibor Shanto - tibor.shanto@sellbetter.ca

redlight

No no no, I am not switching from the second oldest profession to the oldest, but rather speaking about how to make small efforts pay off big. A Red Light Call is simply a call you can make while stopped at a red light driving between appointments or wherever. While it can be thought of being in the same group as Coma Calls, they are different. Red Light Calls can be used in a number of ways to help with a few specific scenarios.

First is to get closer to engaging with potential buyers. Depending on who you read, it could take anywhere from 8 to 12 or more touch points to just connect or engage with a potential prospect. A recent article I read from a credible source, suggested that her recent findings show an average of 8.4 tough points are required in B2B sales. The assumption is that you are ready for the call, know the talk track, salient points you want to hit, and it is just down to getting that other person “on the line”. These touch points can be a combination of e-mail, telephone/voice mail, text messages, snail mail, whatever you can think of, they should vary in the time carried out.

In the majority of instances, I am just looking to set an appointment with the person I am call, understanding that it is unrealistic to complete a quality call on an initial cold call, but it is more than doable to set an appointment where they commit to set aside time to at least listen to you, this can be either face to face or phone. I don’t need to be at my desk to make this appointment call, in fact if I wait for that, it may be hard to vary the times of the call. So one place to be efficient in the use of time and improve you odds is to call when stuck at a red light.

PSA: please take advantage of hands free technology to dial the number, don’t want you to get a ticket or worse.

You’re less inclined to talk, and therefore will be more inclined to focus on getting the appointment and selling from a position of strength. Even if you don’t connect with the party, you can still leave a voice mail, and complete another touch point; but if you connect….

The other great Red Light Call, are those elusive prospects who you just can’t seem to get a hold off in the office, or prospects who have gone “radio silent” in the middle of a sale. There is a certain quality to random calls, not to mention the ability to be productive during “windshield time”.

There is also the benefit of not being trapped to routine. While I am a big fan of structure and planning, there is also a risk of being trapped by it. We get used to a set of behaviours that become habit, and habits can be good or limiting. Including an element of random activities, allows you to make the most of structure, but at the same time do things the schedule does not always allow for. While you can make the most of calling time in the office to focus on your primary targets, Red Light Calls, allow you to go for third tier or other long shots. There goes the light, good bye.

What’s in Your Pipeline?
Tibor Shanto

3 Things Some Pundits Won’t Tell you about Cold Calling – Part 34

By Tibor Shanto - tibor.shanto@sellbetter.ca

Ice Call

 It Actually Works

I am a terrible dancer, I make Elaine from Seinfeld  look like Ginger Rogers, and so as a courtesy to myself, and others at weddings, Bar Mitzvahs, or funerals, I don’t dance. But at the same time, I don’t so anything to spoil other people’s fun with dancing, especially those who do it well. Just because I don’t like it or do it well, does not mean that it cannot be done and enjoyed by others. It also doesn’t mean that those who do it well need to get off the dance floor. You don’t see me running around saying that dancing is an outdated tribal custom, outdated and beneath dignity in today’s socially advanced society.

But it seems that that’s exactly what some of the “never cold call again” crowds are suggesting, no insisting. They don’t cold call, they don’t like to cold call, they don’t get results, meaning they can’t cold call, and therefore cold calling does not work; and that’s that, no one should do it, it is outdated and anti-social; as though everyone who practiced the craft was somehow déclassé.

The problem for me and the no-callers is that dancing is fun for those who enjoy and know how to do it, and I don’t; and cold calling works for those willing to and can do it, which clearly the no-callers can’t. If they could do it right they would find that it help fill and round out the opportunities in their pipeline, and help them make more sales and money. And I have to assume that they want to sell and make money, otherwise they wouldn’t want to sell you their “don’t cold call” stuff, and they would just give it to you.

The fact is that cold calling works, especially in the hands of those who know how to use it. The reason it works is that there as many type of buyers as there are sellers. Each have their own characteristics, which in turn dictate their preferred mode of communication. Some prefer calls, others e-mail, magazine ads, etc. Study after study show that cold calling is only second to referrals in effectiveness for engaging with potential buyers. Factors such as timing, buyer’s current market view, and other inputs will determine what may work when, even with the same buyer. A survey presented in Businessweek showed “referrals from clients or partners (22%), general referrals (16%), and cold-calling or telephone prospecting (13%).” Sure I would prefer to have all warm referrals, but even then, why not add to those with a few well-placed intelligent cold calls.

DiscoverOrg, recently surveyed 1,000 IT decision makers at Fortune ranked, small and medium-sized companies. It showed how outbound sales calls and e-mails affect and “more importantly disrupt vendor selection.” “Seventy-five per cent of IT executives have set an appointment or attended an event as a direct result of outbound email and call techniques.” Further, “nearly 600 said an outbound call or e-mail led to an IT vendor being evaluated.”

I know cold calls can be irritating, but no more so than the endless stream of completely irrelevant, often cheesy e-mail I receive from the hub and Mecca of inbound marketing. At times I am even interested in what they have to say, but they never follow up.

Which leads us back to the central theme of the series this week, the need for a balanced and well thought out pursuit of the right prospects for the right reasons. A combination of strategies, tactics and delivery mechanisms to achieve maximum results and return on effort. Just as I would not give up content marketing, blogging, my social efforts, it is equally silly to ask me or any successful seller to abandon one of the most proven means of engaging with real buyer, specifically cold calling. Maybe it is because I am in Canada, and winter is coming, but combined with other efforts, cold calling works, if you do it right.

What’s in Your Pipeline?
Tibor Shanto

wordpress stat