Welcome to The Pipeline.

Cross training

Five Reasons Your Sales Team Should Be Cross-Trained0

The Pipeline Guest Post – Chase Hughes

As small companies grow, they often see a specialization emerge in their salesforce which only grows to increase its segmentation from one another. The sales department grows to become independent from the customer service, marketing, and other areas of the business. As a startup company, many sales forces intermingle with other departments as they are often in the same floor, right next to one another, and may even be the same person. As companies grow, they can learn from these early stage companies by cross-training their sales team in other areas, or at least promoting engagement with other areas that impact sales. This admittedly does require an investment, but in this article, we will explore five points for why it is helpful to cross-train your sales team.

1. They have a deeper understanding of the customer

The most effective companies have a very strong understanding of their target customer including their demographics, psychographics, and on an emotional level. If a lead generation salesperson has very little interaction with the customer, it would be very difficult to understand any of these points. However, if they interacted with the marketing department, they would be able to effectively understand the quantitative variables from the marketing team and the emotional aspects from the account managers.

2. They understand how their behavior impacts the company more

When a person playing a single role within a company does not have substantial interaction, it is unlikely that they will understand how their behavior impacts others in the company. For instance, a salesperson that only focuses on closing may say things to the customer that negatively impacts the relationship. They really may not care so long as the deal is sold, but the customer may not last long.

3. They feel more engaged with the company

If salespeople understand the role that they play in the pipeline, then they may see the significance of their engagement with it. If they are highly isolated from the company, they do not have much interaction to see how their results influence others in the company, the customers, and the company in its entirety.

4. They have a better understanding of the unique selling proposition

The unique selling proposition for a company is generally not something simply listed on paper; it must be fully understood. If salespeople are interacting with everyone and cross-trained in some other areas, they may see the ‘big picture’ about how the company is actually unique, not just read a script which states why.

5. Other customer facing employees may benefit from their sales experience

Cross-training sales teams and getting them exposure to other parts of the company isn’t just for the benefit of your sales team. There may be product managers which can benefit from interaction with your account managers and ‘closers’ benefiting from training from lead generation experts. Everyone has something to learn and it may not be your sales department at all.

About Chase Hughes

Chase Hughes has six years of experience working in the consulting sector and three years in the private equity sector for large multi-nationals and emerging startups. He is the founding partner of Pro Business Plans, a service that writes business plans for debt and equity capital for startups.

Become one of the thousands of sales professionals receiving my latest updates on sales execution, tools, tips and more.

Join Now!

Einstein

Einstein Selling – The Most Popular Form Of B2B Selling Today0

Tibor Shanto – tibor.shanto@sellbetter.ca

Earlier this year I attended an interesting presentation examining barriers to sales people “hitting” quota, personally I like to exceed quota, but I can understand why for many “hitting” it is a great objective. I enjoyed the presentation, very credible, and in expected fashion, it started out with a big bold revelation to engage the audience. Bam, right off the top we were presented with the following stats including the sources:

  • 79% Of SAAS Sales Reps Miss Quota
  • 14% Never Even Achieve 10% Of Quota
  • Quota Has Risen 33% In The Last 4 Years
  • Reps Hitting Quota Has Fallen 25%

I mean if it wasn’t so sad, if there weren’t people involved, you’d have to laugh about the picture of sales it presents. If this were unfolding in a movie, we’d be sitting in theater yelling “Dude, give it up.”; can you see going on Shark Tank with that premise. Time to stop and rethink this stuff. It would appear that given the various popular forms of selling, SPIN, Sandler, Miller Heiman, and more, the most popular and entrenched method is Einstein Selling. This method focusing on doing the same thing over and over again despite the lack of results. Things really do have to change, real change at the core, not just the veneer which has been the trend and depth over the last 15 or so years, stuck at surface level. We have changed the cover a few times, but left the inside of the book virtually the same, leading to virtually the same results. Hence Einstein Selling, you know, because doing something over and over again and expecting a different result, is the definition of, well either insanity or selling based on the above stats.

Part of the cause for the state sales is in, is due to the popular and simplistic remedies sales leaders look to when trying to address their challenges. Many of the things they turn to are superficial and temporary in nature, not leading to any long term and substantial change in the way their teams approach the market and sell. The constant change of technologies not only suck up a lot of bandwidth and resources, they can confuse front line sales people who are not part of the “planning meetings” and “memos”, they just get bounced around with each new initiative slowing them down, and confusing them about priorities of the month. If the selling process is supposed to reflect the buying process, a lack of commitment to a process and direction will cause the team to lose sales.

Transformation is serious business, much more serious than many in sales and sales leadership are ready for. It is something that takes time and commitment, meaning budgets and other resources. Some sales leaders seem not willing to stomach some of the changes they need to make in order to drive transformation in their organizations, be that a change in process, structure or personnel. They don’t accept that it is better to take the hit now for the sake of transformation and long term improvements, than to suffer a thousand cuts while not improving in any measurable way beyond the surface. At times real transformation of how you sell will also have other costs than just the cost of a new app. In the near turn you are bound to take a hit sales and moral, the successful are the ones that stick to a well thought out plan that takes the long term into account, but is focused on the mid-term from an execution and measurement standpoint, and execution in the near term.

There is a lot of talk and hype when it comes to transformation factors, but you have to reexamine things when “56% of reps were expected to make quota, yet only 48% did”. Einstein Selling at its prime. https://www.accenture.com/ca-en/insight-driving-profitable-sales-growth

Become one of the thousands of sales professionals receiving my latest updates on sales execution, tools, tips and more.

Join Now!

Market-Research4

6 Things Every Good Sales Person Should Know About Personal Branding0

The Pipeline Guest Post – Megan Totka

Today, nearly every person has a personal brand. The good news is, there are a lot of things you, as a salesperson or small business owner, can do to build a really awesome personal brand. You can choose to guide and cultivate the brand or select actions so it’s defined on your behalf – whichever way you choose to build your personal brand, never brush off its importance. You may wonder how to become the complete salesperson – that’s not an easy feat. However, start by taking a look at these six things every good salesperson should know about personal branding.

The importance of being seen as an expert in your field.

It’s harder to be a salesperson today in many ways – it’s the age of the educated consumer. The best salespeople have the ability to curate excellent content and share it via social networks and blogs. They remember to keep it purposeful and relevant and entertaining when possible. Once you decide how you wish your brand to be perceived, you can become more strategic about your personal brand.

The importance of authenticity in relationships.

A good salesperson knows that at the end of the day, human-to-human relationships are what it all boils down to. It’s easier to maintain current customers than sell new ones. A recent survey by Marketing Metrics found that the probability of selling to an existing customer is 60-70%, while the probability of selling to a new prospect is just 5-20%. This is why it’s so important to stay connected with customers on social networks or via email marketing or blogging. Make it a point to learn how to develop an authentic online voice — sounding robotic and giving sales pitches gets you nowhere.

Make sure to keep it personal.

No one wants to feel as though they are just another number, another sale. Good sales people know that they need to do everything they can to learn more about their prospects and clients to make them feel special. Understand the value of promoting your business at a local level. Always remember to personalize any mass emails. Don’t become overly reliant on automation to pull leads. Data can inform but not replace their brain function and intuition.

Never doubt the value of the network.

Networking should never be an afterthought or something that is squeezed into a day. Good sales people look forward to it and it becomes part of their daily routine. Social networks and digital tools help build networks. Good salespeople realize that they can make new connections any day of the week from any location.

Realize it’s crucial to show up and make a statement.

Always wear your Sunday best for presentations and when meeting others. Clean, neat clothes that fit well and neatly combed hair make a good first impression. Take pride in your work: edit letters for errors; check emails before they’re sent, etc. so you don’t look unprofessional. Make sure everything about you makes a positive statement.

Accept that persistence doesn’t do anything good for you.

Good salespeople know the importance of pulling back and think before they overdo it and turn people away. While being assertive is okay, and even coming back to people who previously turned you down is acceptable, it is never okay to hound people. You don’t want to come across as desperate – or even worse — bothersome.

Salespeople always concentrate on their personal brand, and know that the interactions they have leave a trail of bred crumbs straight to their business doors. Good salespeople want people to spread positive word of mouth about their business, and want those words to flow long after they’ve left the room. Most importantly, good salespeople and successful small business owners always remember that a strong personal brand should be ever evolving.

What are some points you think all salespeople should know to make them more successful?

About Megan Totka

Megan Totka is the Chief Editor for ChamberofCommerce.com. ChamberofCommerce.com helps small businesses grow their business on the web and facilitates connectivity between local businesses and more than 7,000 Chambers of Commerce worldwide. She specializes on the topic of small business tips and resources and business news. Megan has several years of experience on the topics of small business marketing, copywriting, SEO, online conversions and social media. Megan spends much of her time establishing new relationships for ChamberofCommerce.com, publishing weekly newsletters educating small business on the importance of web presence, and contributing to a number of publications on the web. Megan can be reached at megan@chamberofcommerce.com.
Website: www.chamberofcommerce.com

Confused by Too Many Choices Arrow Street Signs

Limiting Choices Increases Results0

Tibor Shanto – tibor.shanto@sellbetter.ca

Despite the evidence to the contrary, many sales people and businesses see multiple options presented to prospects as being “good” or the “right” thing, for the prospect, and by extension themselves. Many business owners tell me that they stock or offer a wide range of products or services to ensure that they can meet the demands of all comments. Some of this is based on the assumption that the buyer actually knows what they want. This fatal sales character flaw is shared by many sales people, especially from the consultative or relationship school. These sales people see their role more client therapists than revenue generators.

You can sort of understand the small business owners, clients come in asking for something they currently don’t have. They have two choices, take the time and effort to understand the buyer’s objective, and then sell them on an equally valid alternative they do have. Or, they squeeze some things over on the second shelf, and order a dozen of what the prospect asked for, because “If this guy wants it, so will others, best to be prepared when the next buyer asks for it.” A big if.

While one can’t blame small business owners for falling into the trap of endless choices, it should be different with sales people. Choice is a bad drug, once you are addicted, it takes a lot to kick this habit that’s killing sales, and threatening capitalism as we know it. Yet sales people consume and dispense choice disregarding the impact on their success.

Part of the challenge is people see the role of a sales professional. Broadly speaking there are those “consultative” types, “the customer is always right” types who for the sake of “relationship” will subordinate their success and that of their employers.

Consistently successful sales professionals see their role a little differently, they see themselves as a Subject Matter Expert, (SME). Further, their expertise is not product related, but related to helping the prospect achieve their objectives. Focusing on objectives, business impacts and outcomes, frees one up from worrying about product/service, to outcomes. From a business standpoint it really is about the end, not the means. Focusing on the “end”, the outcomes and impacts, narrows the discussion, and creates focus.

Consultative sellers will present proposals with multiple options, SME’s offer up the right choice based on what the “end” the prospect is trying to achieve. With the former you have to explain each option, the pros and cons of each, the whole exercise begins to look like a spaghetti tossing contest. While many of these sellers take great pride in expounding on each option, demonstrating their rich product knowledge. Here is what the prospect is hearing, “I haven’t got a clue what you are looking for Mr. Buyer, but I gotta make a sale here or my ass is fried; so imagonna put three options in front of you, hope you know what you want, hope I can sell you the middle one, but I’ll settle for the lowest option too, any actually”.

Be the expert, understand what they are trying to achieve, not what they want to buy or you want to sell. No matter what you are selling commodity or rocket ships, limiting choice will help you understand and sell better. In high end products, offering one choice, even when not on the mark, will drive discussion, discovery and insight, and establish you as an expert in the process. Options will give the client the impression you have taken it as far as you can, based on their input, and now they are on their own to make the decision. Risky business.

With commodities, I’ll share a story. I was working with client in a competitive market, there were a lot of choices, vendors, product, bulk, etc. My client’s team would always showcase three offerings, most prospects loved the middle choice, right balance of price/feature. But in the end he sold considerably more of the lowest price product, even among those who loved the middle feature; (just read the “good enough” segment of CEB’s Challenger Customer). I suggested that they drop the lowest option, and just present two, making what was the middle choice now the lowest of the two. His volumes did not go down, but almost all the sales were of the new low, prior middle priced offering.

By limiting choice, he increased outcomes for both his buyers and his company.

QF Webinar

Need to Convert More Leads To Opportunities?0

There is no one single approach to converting more leads to real opportunities, it takes a blend of technology, messaging, and the dynamics.

You are invited to learn how to best combine these elements to generate more opportunities and sales. On Thursday July 21, join Paul Alves, Co-Founder & CRO of Quota Factory, and I, as we present concrete steps to “Increase Outbound Conversions with Objective Based Selling”.

Paul and I will present how to increase the number of lead you actually connect with, how to convert more of those leads leveraging Objective Based Selling and managing the dynamics of the call.

If you are using the phone to sell or set appointments, you need to attend.

  • What a sales development representative needs to be successful and optimize their time
  • The need for, and positive effects of implementing a workflow management system for sales
  • The difference in dialing techniques and selecting the best kind for your sales team
  • How to transform your messaging from solution-based to persona-based
  • Persona-based objective selling techniques
  • How to understand and translate prospects’ dynamics

If you have a team of SDR’s this webinar will help you understand how our clients increased conversions by over 20%.

Register

 

EDGE - New Web

Don’t Talk Yourself Out Of It0

Tibor Shanto – tibor.shanto@sellbetter.ca

People have an amazing ability to convince themselves of almost anything. This is great when they are facing a challenge and they reach inside and not only conceive a means of addressing the challenge, but taking extraordinary action and successfully hitting it head on and overcoming it. Of course the opposite is also true and more common, when people see a challenge, a big challenge in their eyes; so big and seemingly overwhelming, that when they look inside, all they find is the rational for giving up and a list of “why nots”.

Stop Talking To Yourself

Ask any good sales manager or sincere buyer, and they can share numerous examples of sales people who have talked themselves out of a sale. By this I don’t mean the more common example of a sales person who doesn’t shut up long enough to allow the buyer to place the order. This is more about specific instances where the sales person, faced with some difficult options, convinces themselves of “the inevitable negative outcome”, and as a result stops trying to do anything to change the situation in their favour, and settle for the deal being lost.

Sales Process Overview

Let Your Process Do The Talking

To avoid this, and be able to overcome more hurdles you face in selling, you need to turn to something many sales people find boring, and fail to see as a strategic advantage, their sales process. This assumes they or their company has a defined and viable sales process that continues to evolve with the market and buyers. If the have one of those, the other factor is the rep’s propensity to follow it to succeed. Many pretend, or cherry pick, “I like this, I’ll do it; skip that, don’t like it”. If the process is in fact a good one, you need follow it as it is, not your interpretation based on likes, dislikes. If you don’t follow the parts you don’t like, you will not only lose sales, but more importantly, not improve in ways that help you leverage the process and win sales.

Objectivity Rules

One of the best things about having a process is that it takes a lot of the subjectivity out of execution. Rather than your execution reflecting your mood on any given day, the process allows you to perform the right activities, for the right reason, and the right tools at critical stages of the sale. Even in difficult sales or scenario, taking the emotion out of it, and focusing on specific activities, allows you to execute, examine results, adjust and execute again. The same time and energy that went into the emotional side of things, is now applied to specific actions and impacts.

This is why a key component of a viable and evolving process is metrics. The process drives the activity, the measurement allows you to evaluate and set out the next set of actions, measure again, and repeat. Sure you will lose deals, but you will have tried, and understand why you lost after the fact, not because you talked yourself out of things in advance.

Become one of the thousands of sales professionals receiving my latest updates on sales execution, tools, tips and more.

Join Now!

New Or Improved

Same New, Same New!0

Tibor Shanto – tibor.shanto@sellbetter.ca

We are familiar with the expression “same old same old”, indicating that little has changed save the packaging. This is why you don’t see marketers and ad folks lead an advert or campaign by proclaiming that this “new thing they are presenting, is really the same as previous versions or releases, but we did slap a fresh coat of paint on it”. Instead we are presented with yet another new improved dish detergent, that leave the plates no cleaner than last year’s model. We have all seen our favourite web site introduce “upgrades” that feature little or no new functionality, just buttons moved around like the deckchairs on the Titanic.

I think that in sales, for something to qualify as “new”, not swept clean or rinsed off, but truly new, it should have two elements, A) it should allow you to do something in a measurably more efficient way while leading to more prospect and/or sales; B) it should change your behaviour and how you execute moving forward. For example, when BlackBerry introduced the first device to combined e-mail and phone in one handset in 2002. Clearly made one more productive in a sales context and clearly changed the way sales people, and all business people behaved after it’s adoption. Many of the specialized productivity apps you find on tablets, had the same impact on many roles.

As sales professional your most valuable asset is your time, your most valuable tool is your sales process or sales-flow. Any “new” thing, be it a sales tool, app or methodology, should be measured against those two elements, do they free up time that you can reinvest into selling, and do they help you execute your process better, leading to you being able to sell better and more? If they do great, the time and effort invested, the momentary distraction of applying something new, are all worth it given the increased sales and productivity that will follow, and on an ongoing basis. If not, then is it really worth your time and distraction?

While I know a lot of Apple groupies, few get every release of the iPhone. The question that needs to be answered is whether the change was either needed, due to a shift in the market or a flaw with previous iteration. If not, it is a safe bet the biggest beneficiary is the person/company selling the “New”. Did the provider of the service, hardware, software or what have you, manufacture the impetus for change, and is the only one pointing to it, or did it evolve because of a hole in the market? If it is the latter great, especially if that hole is impacting your ability to succeed. If on the other hand the only one impacted by the “new” is the guy selling it, you should spend time elsewhere.

If leveraging your process to better use your time and improve execution to sell better is something new to you, start there, worry about buying something new later. New does not equal good, good equals good, and the test for that is not newness.

Become one of the thousands of sales professionals receiving my latest updates on sales execution, tools, tips and more.

Join Now!

d-orsay-clock_3

The Power of Why > How – Part 20

Tibor Shanto – tibor.shanto@sellbetter.ca 

Monday I wrote about the power of the Why > How one-two punch.  Rather than doing the conventional probing around the decision process, who is involved, what are the steps, are there steps defined or is it ad-hock, etc.  Ask anyone if they are the ones to make the decision, and they’ll likely say yes, ask about Why and How the current vendor was selected, and you may find a different scenario, with additional and at times more important players that will have to be engaged to get the decision you want.  But that’s just the start, you can leverage Why > How, in a more granular way to give you further insights about the buyer, their organization, and how to adjust your execution to achieve success.

First is across time.  Look to the past, present and future.  Looking to the past will not only tell how they do things, people don’t change dramatically.  How they bought software last year or the year before, unless there is an entirely new crew, in which case exploring their past will still provide visibility to how they do things.  Assuming the players have not changed, exploring the past will give you a clear picture as to their propensity to change.  If they have continuously lagged the market in adopting new technologies, if they are still sitting back wait for cloud computing to be validated, you need to adjust your sales approach accordingly, at times even to the point of moving on and revisiting the opportunity in the future.  At the other end are innovators and early adopters, where they are on Moore’s curve will dictate how you execute and win them as a client.

Exploring the future, especially when that exploration is through the prism of their business will also dictate execution.  If they have clear objectives, aligned around elements of their business and how they look to grow it, it will make your sale easier, perhaps easier is the wrong word, more like ‘straight forward’.  Assuming their plans make sense you can focus on helping them achieve them.  If they have clear objectives but have chosen a less than optimal means of achieving them, then you need to first get them to consider alternatives.  Why > How, will help you to get them to change course, preaching is ineffective, but a series of “Why that?”, “How will that look?” questions will help you to get them to look at things differently, and from there to look at different things.

The other plain that Why > How will help is by exploring both the individual you are speaking to, and the Why’s > How’s of their organization.  This is especially important when there are multiple stakeholders or decision makers.  This helps in aligning personal agendas with corporate objectives, this can help you create alignment among the players by focusing on common elements, of each of the individuals, and those of the company.  Minimize differences, especially when not critical to the project, and build on overlap and common elements that you can enhance by virtue of you experience and past success.

I know there are some sales pundits out there who are afraid of the word Why, and would rather have you wait for a random event to trigger your success.  I say take control of your success by asking Why > How, early and often.

Become one of the thousands of sales professionals receiving my latest updates on sales execution, tools, tips and more.

Join Now!

 

key3

A One > Two Combination That Still Delivers Sales1

Tibor Shanto – tibor.shanto@sellbetter.ca 

Much of the discussion around social selling vs. traditional selling, or even old school selling like cold calling, has distracted many from the central issue, successful selling. When was the last time someone congratulated you on landing a big account and asked you “BTW, Ann, did you use social or other selling to win this deal?”. It is more likely that someone would ask about the steps and techniques that could be repeated to deliver similar results consistently.

There is one tried and true approach, that when executed properly can help you and the buyer in a number of ways to come to the right decision in a shorter and less painful time frame and atmosphere. No magic or silver bullet, but a series of questions framed around two simple words and concepts:

  • Why
  • How

Using these two in a one – two combination helps you resolve a number of potential hurdles but avoid some as well.

One common example is when you have worked a sale in accordance to your process. You have interviewed the buyer(s), qualified them, understood their objectives, and then validated them for good measure. You deliver your proposal, expecting to have some discussion, shall we call this ritual “negotiations”, leading to a decision (preferably a buy decision, but at times any decision will do). Only to be told that they need to take it to someone who has not been part of the process to date (owner, boss…). None of us can pretend this has not happened to us. Using the Why > How early in the cycle can reduce or eliminate this, but only if you leave the product out of it, and focus on the buyer’s objectives; and by buyer, I am talking about the individuals and the collective organization.

Start by asking Why they chose the product or process now in place. No pre-bias or agenda, just an honest question as to “why that”? If they are able to clearly articulate why they chose the product/provider, and this should be in detail, and that means you needing to be ready with a number of follow-through questions in order to fully explore specifics. What were they trying to achieve, why didn’t like some of the common alternatives? Why automate instead of outsource? Why on premise vs. cloud? Go deep, don’t just skim the surface. Many will be able to provide answers that are really talking points, but to get real answers, answers that give insight into the situation and the person’s role in the situation, you will need to have at least three follow up questions.

  • Why that objective?
  • How do they measure that?
  • Upside of achieving the objective
  • Implications of a miss; etc.

If they can go into detail about these, contrasting the choices they had to deal with and why they landed where they did, then you are more likely dealing with someone who was involved in the decision, vs. someone who cannot, and therefore was not likely core to the decision, clear signal you’ll need to engage someone else, and now.

Along with the Why questions, you need to introduce How questions. “Great, I understand why you went with that route (product service, provider, etc.), tell me How you went about selecting Vendor X?” The goal here is to get a step by step of the How, giving you a window into how they make decisions. Again, if they can detail How the decision was made, you’re in the right place heading in the right direction. If not, and it is clear that they were secondary in the process, then it is clear that you need to engage others. The goal is to do this really early in the discovery phase, where curiosity and interest are rewarded with information, especially as the questions you are asking relate to them, but provide you with multi level insights.

Again, if you are ready with your follow through questions, then you will also be in a position to learn who was involved in the decision, and is likely necessary to get a decision now.  The great thing is that once you make this Why > How combo part of your routine, you’ll discover that it is a very conversational and inclusionary approach, where buyers are allowed to reflect and share info rather than interrogating or pitching.

They Why > How works on almost any element of the sale, but it does require practice and preparation. In the next post, we’ll go deeper and wider with this proven and easily implemented one-two punch.

Become one of the thousands of sales professionals receiving my latest updates on sales execution, tools, tips and more.

Join Now!

strategy board

Why sales reps are always “Just touching-base”!3

The Pipeline Guest Post – Gerald Vanderpuye

Just Touching Base!

In baseball, a player who is touching base is not in danger of being put out. In sales, we must continue to touch-base or follow-up as it’s also known to stay in the game of sales.  When your rep loses a real opportunity, it’s because of a poor follow up. You sales rep couldn’t touch base either in the right manner or failed to follow-up enough.  

Time kills deals!

Professional sales people know time kills deals and deals get stuck in the infamous black hole where nothing happens for days weeks and months. This is the moment when it is more important than ever to touch base.

The Follow-up challenge!

Although sales managers would argue some sales reps are simply lazy and refuse to follow up, the problem for the majority of salespeoplesales people is more about effectively following up rather than the will to follow up.

An effective follow-up strategy gets a sales deal out of the black hole and back on into the light (the sales process).  We use the term black hole because sales have no idea what’s going on with the buyer and the deal, all they know is the deal is slowly getting out of their control and getting harder and harder to touch base.

This lack of information about the buyer leaves salespeople following up blindly which ends with disengaged Buyers who get spammed and annoyed.  We delved deep into thousands of deals and got an insight into what was happening on the Buyer side.

Know when to Follow up!

Opportunity win rate  for our customer is between 8%-40% for all new sales. At least 60% of buyers were never going to buy and ultimately waste the reps time.  We then measured how much time buyers spent on reading the sales and marketing content shared and discovered hundreds of Buyers often show initial engagement, then drop off, however, come back at a later stage. Without these insights, sales reps were often touching base at times totally out of sync with the when the buyers are most interested.  Imagine a Buyer that is disengaged during the month of February yet receives seven follow-up emails from the sales rep.  The sale is lost in the CRM. However, there is no follow up when the buyer come’s back to the shared marketing content months down the line when the interest is real and sale is back on.

Give your Buyer a reason to act now!

There is another 25% of Buyers that are genuinely interested in the problem you are solving! They simply do not have a compelling reason to act now.  In this scenario, the touching base is mostly about being consistent with the relevant content that either generates a compelling reason for the buyer to act.  

Helping your buyer sell Internally

Finally,  prospects who are struggling to sell your product internally. There are other stakeholders they need to bring into the picture, and they need the right messaging and content to capture these stakeholders interest.  Can you help your champion get their interest with your content and follow ups?   

Professional sales enablement organisations understand that an excellent follow-up strategy is a must for success as 80% of closed deals require five follow-ups before close. Although this Data for why sales reps need to follow up is evident still 44% of salespeople give up after one follow-up.   BuyerDeck provides sales reps real data about where the buyer is in the buying cycle (Not the sales process ) and suggests the perfect content/message to follow up effectively.

If you are interested in helping your sales teams better follow up with technology that is fully integrated into your CRM here is an opportunity.  We are now giving away 5000 free licences to broaden our feedback pool. Visit our giveaway site to see if you qualify.*

About Gerald Vanderpuye

As a proud co-founder at BuyerDeck, I have three passions: I love sales, technology and creating happy customers. I have been in sales, marketing and delivering remarkable customer experiences the last 10 years. My last position was at Rackspace where I was responsible for  developing sales strategy and driving business growth through existing customers and new Logo acquisitions in key markets. I was leading and managing a diverse team to deliver on new growth targets for both Enterprise and SMB’s. I am now leading the team at BuyerDeck to bootstrap the distribution of our B2B SAAS product beyond the initial traction of 12K buyers and sellers.

 

* I do not receive payment of any sort from BuyerDeck, just looking to help them give away 5000 licences. Tibor Shanto

 

wordpress stat