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The Power of Denial0

By Tibor Shanto – tibor.shanto@sellbetter.ca 

Wanting to understand “why” and “how” are a curiosity we are all born with. Just look at infants and toddlers, they are always asking “why” and “how” questions, something may be mundane or old hat to me, is brand new and completely unimagined to them until they see or experience it. But as they enter the school system, things change; a small minority maintain their constructive curiosity, not settling, they continue to push the envelop to discover more, discover “how” things work, and “why” things have to be the way they are, “why” not different. are keen to change, add to, or take away from a technique, to see what incremental change will lead to incremental gains that add up over time. Even when they succeed, win first prize, they are never satisfied, because they know more will be required tomorrow, and certainly the next fiscal year.

And then there is the rest, the majority, those who from the time they enter school, seem to look for little more than the opportunity to exist and sustain. They are taught and quickly learn to “fall in line”, accept how “things work”. Their success (as such), is based on, and thrives by continuing to tow the line and play to the current wave. Rather than leveraging curiosity to propel them further, they wait to be told “how” to do things and “why”. Success here of course is not measured by quality of output, but by how well they play within the lines and being able to deny any and all things outside those lines. They learn how to rationalize and deny; and with years of practice, they are ready to move into the work force, prepared to deliver. Needless to say, some of these people grow up to be sales people, where playing between the lines and denial as an art form, seem to be core and sought after capabilities.

If you doubt this, ask yourself why so many underperforming reps continue to be employed, while continuing to miss quota. Or why the Pareto Principle, the 80/20, is so entrenched, and unchallenged in the sales world; rather than challenging the principle it, people operate as though it was divinely ordained. Interestingly, someone was sharing some data with me recently, that suggested that it is now 13% of reps delivering 87% of the revenue.

It takes a lot of attitude and effort to avoid the seduction of denial. As we progress from school to post secondary, the art of denial is fine tuned and reinforced. Speak to the “average” students, and they have learned to rationalize their results much better than learning the subject matter they “averaged” in. They point to those A+ students as anomalies, denying the facts at hand. By the time they arrive at work, their habits and attitudes are set, faced with a choice of taking a different tack than their peers or denying results, and the latter wins with most. Their managers, themselves plucked from the pool of deniers, just reinforce the whole mess, and cycle continues.

Don’t disperse, while the power and seduction of denial is great, there is a way to overcome it, and it is a tactic that will help your interactions with buyers as well. Make a difficult, but important change. Rather than telling people, including prospect, “why” and “how” things are, change to asking “why” and “how”, and then deal with the answer. Most exceptional sellers I know, the 20% (13%), fear failure, and are willing to go a path less followed; while the 80% (87%), fear success, and everything that brings, and opt for the power of denial!

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Done

Just Do It?0

By Tibor Shanto – tibor.shanto@sellbetter.ca 

No, I am not questioning the message behind Nike’s well known slogan or mantra, nothing to do with Nike at all.

I am talking to and about sales people who regularly fail to follow through on expectations they set for people they work with, but most importantly, prospects and customers.

We have all familiar with old sales adage: “Under Promise – Over Deliver”, well it seems many sales people feel that only applies to some things, some actions, but not all. While most get how to leverage this from a product perspective, they seem to feel they have immunity when it comes to actions they have committed to. While existing clients may be a bit more tolerant of tardiness, (although they should not have to be), prospects who have never dealt with you, have nothing else to parse a decision around than your ability or willingness to actually follow through, in the way you said you would.

Buyers long ago have realized that even products claiming to be bleeding edge and “revolutionary”, are at best evolutionary in nature, or last year’s model with a fresh coat of paint. This leaves the interaction with the rep and the selling organization as one the determinant and differentiator in a decision. While it is always an advantage to be able to deliver insight that prospects can action and achieve more than they set out to achieve, or take any action they otherwise would not have. But absent that, and believe me in a world of feature, buzzword and price selling, it is very absent, the only thing left is how we sell, and core to that is how we deliver on even the smallest commitment we make.

DoneWhile I understand that there are more demands than ever on sales people’s time, there are (or so we are told) just as many new tools allowing sales professionals to maximize their time. This really is a situation where you are in control, both in the commitments you make, and the ones you chose not to follow through on. The fact that many, pundits and buyers, recognize that you are having to pack 16 hours into a ten-hour day, does not equal having permission not to do something, especially things we committed to with prospects/buyers. Things includes the “smaller” things, but in a world “same”, it will those little things that will swing decisions.

There are some simple things we can do. Starting with prioritizing, and not just in creating a list, but in how we set expectations for prospects. If something indeed is “small” in your estimation, then the expectations you set around it should also be small. You can tell a prospect you will have an answer for them much further out than you would for delivering something impacting an impending buy decision.

Couple this with other useful practices. One is the old Urgency/Importance matrix, allowing you to prioritize activates, and make sure they are done. Add to this the practice chunking, where you set allocate specific time to the practice of setting out “chunks” of time for specific tasks. Where many limit their success is not extending these to their calendar. If it has to be done, it needs to be scheduled! If you don’t have the time, and you know it going in, don’t promise, or know who you will delegate it to. While I appreciate the power of intent, it does not replace do, or make up for something you don’t do that you led the prospect to believe you would.

While it is natural to focus on the on the visible, the things that you get done, but buyers are more likely to remember the things we don’t do.

Want to maximize your sales time, grab your copy of “Sales Happen In Time”, and make time work for you!

Disapproval thumbs down by a male executive.

3 Reasons Your Voice Mails Fail0

By Tibor Shanto – tibor.shanto@sellbetter.ca 

Voice mail is not going away, mostly because people will have to answer their phones rather than being able to screen calls and preserve their time and sanity for things other than bad prospecting calls. Leaving you to make one of two choices:

  1. Not to telephone prospect, thereby avoiding the dreaded voicemail
  2. Learn how to leave proper voice mails and prosper from the dreaded voicemail

True to Pareto’s principle, the majority of sales people chose option one, and do not make calls; and based on stats, it seems do not make quota, am I the only one making the connection here? Here are three reasons your voice mails are failing, and how to change that and your prospecting results.

1. Intent

Every action you take in sales has to have a purpose, and intended outcome that moves the opportunity forward. Most have the wrong intent when it comes to voice mail, if they have an articulated intent at all.

There is one purpose for leaving a message, and that is to get a call back, that’s it, nothing else, one singular measure of success, a call back.

But if you listen to most messages, sales people reach for (and miss) much more. They overload the prospect with a bunch of unnecessary information, which lead to everything but the prospect wanting to call you back.

Your message should not be geared to getting an appointment or schedule a call, it should not be to introduce you, your company or product, certainly not to sell. Again, One Singular Purpose: get a call back!

2. TMI

Too much information, yes, building on the above, ask yourself why someone would call you back if your message contains everything they need to make a decision. Think about it, 99% of outbound voice mail greetings contain a request for “detailed information”, and why do they want that information? So they know why not to call you back. So as you’re waxing poetic about how you’re calling from a Fortune 500 company, a leader in the area of Blah Blah, they are looking around thinking they already have a Blah Blah, they are not currently looking for more or a new Blah Blah, so they 76 your message. Leaving you to believe that voice mail does not work, when in fact the problem is the message you leave, while your words say you want to speak, the underlying “message” communicates, don’t bother.

3. Be Counter Intuitive

The are uncomfortable when they lack enough information to make up their mind, which is why point 2 above is key, information works against us. The human mind hates a mystery, a situation where they may not feel completely compelled to call you back, but are also left with the feeling that if they don’t they may be missing out on something. In that scenario, some will ignore the message, but almost as many will act to solve the mystery. My goal in voice mail is to leave just enough of a message to create a curiosity, and the only way to satisfy that curiosity, is to pick up the phone and find out.

Focus your intent, provide only enough information to drive that intent, don’t worry about being different, and don’t pay attention to those who have not picked up a phone for years.

Want to learn how I get 50% of messages returned within 72 hours? Click here to learn the method in detail.

3 Sterne Bewertung

Can We Stop Accepting Average? Please!0

By Tibor Shanto – tibor.shanto@sellbetter.ca 

Something has changed over the last few years, and it needs to be reversed. There is too much celebrating of average, everywhere, but especially sales.

Average may be a good measure to use when comparing house prices on a given street, but falls short when it comes to measuring accomplishments, setting goals, or anything that counts, especially in sales. Let me remind everyone that average = typical; common; ordinary. Not something one would use to describe themselves or loved ones, yet, we seem to celebrate it almost daily.

Average is certainly not something you see at the top of skills listed in job postings for sales positions. BTW, cold calling is, yet the average salespeople seem to find it difficult to execute this basic sales skill. Even when coached and directed, the average reps seem to search for reasons not to do execute core sales activities.

3 Sterne BewertungThe difference between average and excelling is not a great as many would have you believe, and while it may be easy to point at the reps involved, it may be worth looking at what in their support (or lack of support) system allows to get away with it, and at times encourage it, starting with their managers. For a number of reasons many managers are afraid to call out mediocrity or averageness. Sure, HR policies and a litigious environment contribute to this, managers need play an active role in helping people exceed average, or help the individual transition to something they can be more than average at.

It does not help that many managers are reluctant to address the issue head on. I have had managers tell me that they’d rather have someone in the territory than have it vacant. I get it, but I firmly believe and have seen that the long-term damage to revenue in such territories, when an average rep is sent to compete against accomplished sellers. I have heard the arguments about the costs, direct and hidden, that are associated with rep turnover, but the answer is not hanging on to average, but having the conviction and guts to hire the right reps. Coming from the “hire slow, fire fast” school, the holding on should happen at the front end of the process, during hiring, not in avoiding the firing.

In some ways, you can’t blame only those involved on ground level. Many of these average sellers are a product of ‘The “Participation Trophy” generation’. Looking at the charts presented, it is likely to get “averager” before it gets better. Unlike little league, in sales only one rep goes home with the deal, the others, as they say, have hungry babies (and maybe a ribbon).

The cost for all this is borne not only by the organizations and those reps who strive to achieve, rather than just participate, and spend more time and energy on excuses rather than execution. Which leads to the average sales force where a hand full of committed professionals will always outperform a stable of also-rans, the choice is yours, not matter what you tell yourself.

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Go the Extra Mile to Succeed and Clinch a Deal

5 Keys to shortening the selling process0

By Tibor Shanto – tibor.shanto@sellbetter.ca 

What if you could shorten the sales cycle, easily?

One common topic that comes up in conversation with sales leaders is how to shorten their sales cycles. At first glance it seems logical, shorter cycles seem to offer a number of benefits, but it’s not always as it seems. While I have often written about how you can shorten you sales cycle, I have also suggested that it may not in fact need to be shorter, just more efficient in execution.

As with other key aspects of sales it is not a one size fits all affair, there is a balance that needs to be struck to achieve the benefits desired without additional risk. Add to that the challenges in transition the plan from the whiteboard to the real world. Then there is the most important element, the customer, their expectation, and their view of the length of the “buy cycle”.

As part of the Microsoft Dynamics Business Applications webcast series, I had the opportunity to delve into the question of shortening the sales cycle with Barbara Giamanco and Deb Calvert. Among the areas explored were:

  • Develop clarity around what the “length of the sales cycle” really means
  • Understand why your buyer isn’t the only one responsible for dragging out the sales cycle
  • Discover the number one way to shrink your sales cycle now
  • Learn how to use content strategically to move sales conversations forward
  • Know the right questions to ask to move the cycle forward move quickly

The webcast is now available on demand, and I invite you to take the time to view the conversation, the data and viewpoints presented will help you not only understand if you do need to shorten your cycle, but how to best go about it.

Feel free to let us know if we missed anything or if you’d like to drill deeper into any specific elements presented.

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Night view of rail tracks in depot, Kiev

Changing Your Path To #Prospecting #Success2

By Tibor Shanto – tibor.shanto@sellbetter.ca 

No one says telephone prospecting is easy, which is why I am always puzzled as to why many sales people make it even more difficult than it already is. Many don’t set out to sabotage themselves, some are not even aware they are doing it, and many are just sadly following the advice of pundits who talk about but don’t actually telephone prospect. What many are doing is ignoring some basics communication realities that in a sales situation cannot and should not be ignored.

Over 90% of sales conversations are started or initiated by the seller, this goes to 100% of telephone prospecting calls, especially cold calls. So how we start the call will very much dictate the flow of the call, and even the reaction of the prospect. Start things the right way and you improve your odds, start the wrong way, and you dig a hole that will be hard to get out of. How you start a cold call matters, that’s why scripts are important.

While everyone agrees that the first few seconds of a call are crucial to the success of the call, most still chose to squander those precious seconds.

Most recipients of cold calls start down a path, in most cases that path is headed to them blowing us off and getting back to work. Our job is to either set them on a different path, or change the path they started down, if not, the conclusion is clear, no prospect, (they are back doing what they were before we interrupted), no opportunity, frustration, and time we will never recover, gone. This mainly happens because we play into the expectation of the prospects, instead of challenging those expectations.

Having listened to thousands of real world calls, most calls start by telling the prospect who is calling, and in its worst form this includes the callers title, and some self-serving statement about their employer: Hi, my name is George Handoff, I am the Mid-Atlantic Account Manager with ACME Corp. a Fortune 500 company and leading manufacturer of Sprocket Valves.” Who cares, what does that tell someone you have interrupted in the middle of their day? Do you really expect them to get excited about any of that? This is usually followed by highlighting the types of problems you have “solutions” for. No, that’s not the sound of them hanging up, it is their head hitting the disengage button as they fall asleep listening to all that, the ones that stay awake, just blow you off.

Given the fact that only about 3 of 10 people you call will recognize the problem, and only one of those three are willing to act now. The other seven could care less because they don’t see themselves in the picture, and your opening statement sets them down the path of “Who cares, I need to go back to work, good bye.”

To set them on a different path, why not start the call by highlighting what things look like after your product is in place. Lead with the outcomes! How many more units did you help someone produce in the same or less time; how did you improve their cash-flow; how much did you help increase market share, or how many of their target prospects did you help them land, how many more appointments did your prospects have as a result of your work, and what was the increase in pipeline value? Those are interesting opening that set the conversation on a path they not only can relate to, but want to achieve as well.

It’s not a big change, but one where you are presenting your capabilities via specific outcomes and impacts your clients had and were able to achieve as a result of your offering. That’s a path worth exploring, one they are thinking about, but no one is calling about, especially those waiting to be found.

The only reason many will tell you that cold calling sucks is because of the results they are getting. But rather than giving up on the cold call, they should give up on their approach, and try a path that has an ending of interest to prospects, be they Looking or Status Quo.

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antiker Koffer voll mit antiken Gegenstnden

Odds & Sods0

By Tibor Shanto – tibor.shanto@sellbetter.ca 

Every year I jot down different ideas, always with the goal of fleshing them out and building decent post. For a myriad of reasons, sometimes these ideas don’t get developed, but unlike previous years, I am resolved not to let them evaporate with time. As a result what follows are ideas I think people in sales should be thinking about, but rather than waiting to polish them up, I am putting them out their in their raw state, and set them free to grow and evolve with you. Let me know what you think, push back, evolve the ideas, let’s see where they go, or not.

Benchmarking

Benchmarking is a good idea, but only if you are benchmarking for the sake of making progress. Set out to improve an element of your game, set a goal, measure where you are, develop an action plan, then execute. Going a step better, one can benchmark against another entity doing a similar thing, and see how you are doing vs. them in specific measures. In sports, it could be measures like goals against, team batting average, or in our favourite sport, average deal size, time to recover cost of acquisition or leads to opportunities converted. Many sales organisations are not as adventurous as others in what they choose to compare (benchmark), or who they benchmark themselves against.

So why is it that only the best choose to benchmark themselves against the best, or at the least, better than they are. While the weak and also-rans, always benchmark themselves against people “behind” them. What’s the point in measuring how well you are doing against someone who has figured out less than you, why not mark yourself, be you a rep or sales organization, against the best, or better than you. Sure you can pat yourself for being ahead of the lesser competitors, why not look forward and make gains, rather than maintaining an easy lead.

antiker Koffer voll mit antiken Gegenstnden2017 The Year Of Sales Enablement

Seems the marketing cooks in Salesland are whipping up something “new” for 2017. Top on the list is rebranding, because you know what they say, if you can’t innovate, rebrand. Just like the New Improved Tied, often the only thing new is the wrapping and the hype. Just look at the recent rebranding of Key Accounts to the new look Account Based Marketing, a brilliant twist emphasising something that really isn’t there.

While traditional product marketers may test the “new” in a limited way, do consumer surveys, and the occasional focus group. In Salesland, they are more prone to doing soft launches, and when enough people jump on, they go full hog, and ride that wave till it runs out of power.

But the big thing in Salesland, percolating a while now, shaping and defining itself, but now ready to be painted over the previous Sales 2.0 veneer, is Sales Enablement. Despite efforts, Sales 2.0 didn’t plant roots, there were those who tried to keep it alive well past it’s “good through” date, but the savvy in Salesland jumped ship early and went social. So now it’s time to rebrand and try to peddle the same old with a new twist and new tweets, well at a minimum new hashtags.

For those who doubt this make over, one need only consider “The Sales Enablement Society (SES, really close to SOS)”. Their stated goal “is to better define and ultimately solve, the vast disparities that exist in sales enablement roles and functions in organizations today.” A worthwhile exercise indeed – a good start would be a definition.

But I would imagine that if sales enablement continues to be different for those who sell services, from those who sell technology applications, it will suffer the same fate as Sales 2.0 and the Sales 2.0 Alliance, remember them? Can’t wait for the line up at the Sales Enablement Echo Conference.

Salesland needs to stop following false idols and embrace the one reality in sales, success is about Execution – Everything Else Is Just Talk!

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IDeen

Resolve to be a Contender Not Column Fodder0

By Tibor Shanto – tibor.shanto@sellbetter.ca 

If you are in B2B sales, you have, knowingly or not, been column fodder. I often ask sales people if they know what that means, and for the most part most do not. While some of you may know what I mean, others may not so let’s define. It is a situation where a buyer has decided that they will give the business to a specific, usually favoured, vendor. These same buyers, also know from experience or set expectations, that their boss (or the owner), will want to see some comparables before approving said purchase. So they set things up in a spreadsheet for presentation.

Column A – This has all their requirements
Column B – The chosen vendor, the one that will get the deal short of divine intervention (bad news for atheist sellers).

But they know the boss is going to ask to see options, so this buyer engages with two other vendors. Asking very specific questions, questions matching the requirements in Column A. This line of questioning often fools sales people making them believe that the interest is real due to the specificity of the questions, and the degree of engagement by the prospect. (I know earlier I called them a buyer, but that is only true for the vendor in Column B, if you’re in C or D, they are and will only ever be prospects.) In the end the buyer presents these in a way where Column B is all but assured that they win the deal, and you and one other rep serve as column fodder.

But it does not have to play out that way. You can take steps to either avoid playing the game, or play it to disrupt and win. Contrary to what some may think, I think the prudent course is to avoid playing the game, and spend the time and energy prospecting for potential buyers who are willing to engage based on merit, not the need to justify a purchase from someone other than you.

First thing you can do is to ensure that you are interviewing the prospect as much as they interview you. While it is the prospect who should be speaking more, it is the seller who should set that into motion with good questions that not only bring light to the issue, but challenge the prospects pre-conceptions, and direction. With Fodder calls, not only is the rep talking more than the prospect, but the prospect is driving the direction, asking the questions, and keeping the discussion in predetermined petametres that deliver the desired result, fodder, not knowledge.

IDeenIf it is a real curiosity, you could get to the root of things by asking a combination of:

Where they are now?
How they measure the situation?
Where they had planned to be?
Why the Gap?
Quantify the impact of addressing the Gap?
Quantify the impact of inaction to address the Gap?
Extrapolate Rewards over entire the course of ownership/benefit?

If you can’t change the path the conversation is on, you need to seriously think about walking away. If the conversation is nothing like the ones that lead to closed deals, you have to ask why, and then react accordingly.

I have some reps tell me that they “play” along, believing if the chosen vendor drops the ball, they will be “next in line”. Problem is even if that happens, human ego often prevents the buyer from coming back Column C or D, a new search is much simpler for them.

Last thought, that time you wasted playing Fodder, not only could have been spent with a real prospect, but you’ll never get it back.

Be a Contender in 2017!

See you next year!!

Think outside the box concept on a white background

Getting Out Of Your Sales Box0

By Tibor Shanto – tibor.shanto@sellbetter.ca 

Given today is Boxing Day here in Canada, and that I am off enjoying the holiday (the bargains), I thought it was a good day to reprise a piece from 2010 about thinking out of the box. Enjoy!

There is a lot of talk in sales and in marketing about ‘thinking out of the box'; this is big with me because I am sure that when they put me in a box I’ll be dead, and that’s not good. But all too many in sales people are stuck in their boxes, they may say they think out of the box, even when they are too afraid to come out of the box. It’s so warm and cozy, easy to explain, not like outside the box.

Now being in sales, and having the ego to go with it, you’re probably sitting there thinking “phew, can’t be talking about me, I always think out of the box, hey even that sales tech said so last week before I bought her lunch.”

Well let’s test things and find out, shall we?

Answer the following question: What’s one and one?

Waiting

Waiting

Waiting

Write your answer here: _____

One more, what’s three and three?

Waiting

Waiting

Waiting

Write your answer here: _____

So, what did you put down, 2 for the first one, and 6 for the second?

You’re so in the box!

The first one is obviously eleven; and the second is thirty-three.

Absolutely it is a right answer, look, just step out of your box a minute, yes you can keep one hand on it for security if you need to.
Look here man, 1 and 1, or 11, it’s eleven. Again, 3 and 3, 33, thirty-three, right?

Of course it is, if you said two, you choose to only partially listen to what I was asking. Thought you heard one plus one, right? This was amplified by the echo chamber that is your box, and bam, an answer that misses the opportunity presented. How many times do you faced this same risk with customers, thinking you understood what they were saying only to blow it?

In sales, you must float on or ride your experience, not be weighed down by it; like a surfer on a big wave, you can use it to be propelled forward, or be crumbled by its power. You need to interpret and react according to the specific situation, be creative in responding, not predictable with your comebacks.

You need to use and leverage language and imagination in moving sales forward. But if you insist one and one is two not 11, then you need to relax and open the lid a bit more, a lot more. By leveraging language and imagination you will not only challenge yourself to creatively resolve challenges, but also encourage your buyers to step up and step beyond their limits, especially in how they limit their view of their challenge, and things that limit their perception of “a” solution.

It is one thing to say you think or act out of the box, another to execute. Many talk beyond their box and then be as conventional as ever in their execution. Selling is about change, step out of your box if you expect the buyers to abandon theirs.

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win-lose-draw-dice

Crash and Learn2

By Tibor Shanto – tibor.shanto@sellbetter.ca 

While we are all caught up in the cheer of the season, it is important to remember that sales is not always peace, love and joy. In fact, when you consider closing averages in B2B sales, it is most likely that we are bound to have more disappointments than joys as measured by that figure. Some have put the number of sales qualified leads to close, as low as 16.4%, across all B2B; I am sure if you take out the outliers, it is likely a more presentable number. Let’s go with 4:1 or 25%, now if you’re one of those who say sales is not a numbers game, you don’t have to worry about this or the rest of this piece. But if you are looking to improve in the coming year and beyond, it is clear that the best learning opportunities are in examining the losses, and working to change those outcomes.

I know there are some pundits who will tell you to ignore anything but wins, and work on repeating things that are working. The question is will that change the 4:1 win rate, or just help you maintain things? While no one wants to dwell on the negative, the best way to change it is to avoid repeating things, which what happens when you just look at one side of things. In fact, the best sales people and organizations, look at three side of things, The Wins, The Losses, and The No Decisions.

win-lose-draw-diceGiven the time of year, I would encourage you to look back and not only examine recent deals, but the deals from the entire year. Look for trends that impact the entire market, and then sub trends that are unique to key segments. This will not only help you understand how things have evolved over the year, why you may have won or lost, how you need to adjust your sales approach to win in the future, and the added bonus of identifying some potential calls for the start of the year to people who chose not to decide last year.

The challenge is to ensure that this is a real drill down as to what happened and what will need to be done differently next time. This usually means going beyond where you were willing to go to get the sale, the fact that we lost is evidence of that. You also need to involve the buyer who did not buy from you, which is not always easy, not only because you’ve been rejected, but they are busy implementing their choice.

In most instances interviewing buyers you lost should be done by someone other than the rep involved, it’s easy to blow them off, just point to price and features, and the rep spends more time repeating that to their company, than changing how they presented the features and price. Use someone from marketing or Customer Success. Whoever ends up conducting the review, make sure they are armed with solid questions that help you understand the buyer’s process and choice, this is not about defending your company or changing the buyer’s mind.

Having a formal approach helps the clients feel more at ease about the process, and gets you actionable insights. Done right, this review of a loss or no decision, could be one of the factors that allows you to be part of the picture next time they go to market. Ignoring why you lost will continue to limit your opportunities, and long term personal and sales growth.

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